Mother M. Germaine ONeill Mother M. Casimir Murray Mother Mary William Craig Mother M. Josepha Hurley Sister M. Marcella Gill Sister M. Sylvia Morgan Sister M. Eugenia Kealey Sister M. St. Mary Orr Sister M. Coleman Nee Sister Mary Reap Sister Anne Munley
<< 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 >>
1989

Marywood s five entries in the nationwide annual advertising awards competition of the newspaperAdmission Marketing Report wins a gold medal, a silver medal, and three merit awards, February. The entries include an admissions package (catalog, posters, and ads), a viewbook, an admissions preview piece, an inaugural package, and a booklet entitled The Presidential Years. All are produced by members of the Public Relations design and writing staff.
1989

The Marywood Players perform A Doll s House.
1989

Mathematics Department member Marie Loftus receives an award for outstanding service from the Pennsylvania Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Spring.
1989

The Marywood Players stage a production of Arms and the Man, Spring.
1989

Marywood publishes the first journal of writings produced by students in the College Honors Program,Spring. Named Scientia, for the second word of the school s motto, the journal contains essays written as senior theses by four graduates of the Program.
1989

The University of Notre Dame Concert Band performs its "Americana-At-Its-Best" program in the Marywood College Theater, March 6.
1989

Consumer advocate Ralph Nader gives a lecture at Marywood, entitled Who Will Stand Up for Corporate Responsibility , March 12.
1989

Dominic Cossa, described as one of the most beautiful baritone voices you are likely to come across anywhere, sings the lead role in the Oratorio Elijah in the Performing Arts Theater, March 18. Concertmaster for the performance is Jule Supplee, and Robert Dale Herrema directs the Marywood College Community Orchestra.
1989

Marywood celebrates National Adult Education Week, March.
1989

Dr. Clarence Walton, former Chair of the Board and President of The Catholic University of America, speaks in the Nazareth Student Center on The Moral Manager, May 4.
1989

Mary Matulevich, affectionately known as Mary Home-Ec to the College community and alumni, is honored for a half century of service during a Years of Service celebration, May 8.
1989

Marywood College hosts the Ecumenical Forum of Lackawanna County, May.
1989

Marywood s campus wins recognition when the May/June issue of Pennsylvania Magazine names it The Most Beautiful Religious College Campus in the State. The award is a tribute to the College s five-man grounds crew, headed by superintendent John Burns, a professional taxonomist and twenty-three-year veteran employee of Marywood.
1989

Sister Margaret Gannon is featured as Woman of Northeastern Pennsylvania in the Scranton Sunday Times, June 4.
1989

Msgr. Joseph M. Champlin, nationally known author, presents the keynote address at a Liturgical Convocation held at Marywood College, commemorating the 25th Anniversary of the Promulgation of the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, June 10.
1989

The President s Office and the Institutional Research Department are moved from the Liberal Arts Center to the newly renovated Immaculata Hall, Summer.
1989

During Homecoming, Ann Joyce Flanagan 32, former long-term member of the English faculty, receives the Sister Denis Donegan Award for outstanding service to the College.
1989

The Legal Assistant Program receives approval from the American Bar Association, the first in Northeastern Pennsylvania to do so.
1989

The Marywood Players stage a production of Fiddler on the Roof, Fall.
1989

Marywood is a comprehensive college with 3,058 undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in four schools: the Undergraduate School for Women, the Gillet School, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and the Graduate School of Social Work, Fall.
1989

Immaculata Hall is refurbished. It is the first entire building expressly redesigned to house Sisters since fire destroyed the original Motherhouse in 1971. Even now, not all can be accommodated, and some choose to remain where they have become established. The revised Immaculata Hall harbors five suites, each containing nine personal rooms, a lounge with recliners and a television set, and an efficient kitchen with adjacent dining area. Ramps and an elevator facilitate access to and movement within the building, which also includes a small, quiet chapel and a spacious first floor lounge with fireplace. Also situated in Immaculata Hall is the new office complex of the President, with areas for Sister Mary Reap s secretaries and assistants, a board room for executive-level conferences, and a dining room in which the President can entertain College guests in an attractive, private setting. Nearly all of the renovations are carried out by the skilled builders and craftsmen on Marywood s maintenance staff, who are hosted and toasted for their talents by Sister Mary at a special reception in Immaculata Hall in the fall.
1989

Marywood College marks the beginning of its Diamond Jubilee with a Eucharistic Celebration, September 8, concelebrated by His Excellency, The Most Reverend Pio Laghi, S.T.D., J.C.D., Apostolic Papal Pro-Nuncio to the United States; the Most Reverend J. Carroll McCormick, retired Bishop of Scranton; and Auxiliary Bishop Francis X. DiLorenzo. The homily is delivered by the Reverend Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., President Emeritus of the University of Notre Dame. Following the Mass, a luncheon is served at Nazareth Hall, after which those in attendance witness the dedication of the renovated Immaculata Hall. A gala black-tie reception that evening at Genetti s Manor in Dickson City forms the setting for the climax of the day s festivities, the awarding of Marywood s Presidential Medal to Archbishop Laghi, Father Hesburgh, actress Helen Hayes, "First Lady of the American Theater" (making a return to the campus after thirty-six years), and President Emerita of the College, Sister M. Coleman Nee.
1989

Bishop McCormick rededicates and blesses the renovated Immaculata Hall, September 8.
1989

The computerization of the library s card catalog and circulation procedures, a project envisioned in 1980, is dedicated, September 19. The new system is the result of years of foresight and research on the part of the late Sister Constance Melvin, former executive director of the Learning Resources Center, and of people like its director, Mary Ann Fedrick, whom Sister inspired to carry on her work. The system is known by the acronym MELVIN, which signifies Marywood Electronic Library VAX Information Network and also commemorates the family name of Sister Constance. It not only integrates all library functions but also allows students to access information from the Learning Resources Center through their own personal computers, making the College a national model for campus-wide data networking.
1989

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Neil Sheehan lectures at Marywood s Performing Arts Center on "Vietnam: How Could This War Have Happened ", September 24.
1989

Alumni celebrate the College's 75th anniversary year in a reprise of their roles in past student musicals during a show entitled Broadway at Marywood, September 30. Many members of the original casts of The Sound of Music, Hello, Dolly, Mame, The King and I, The Music Man, Carousel, Irene, Oklahoma!, My Fair Lady, and Camelot reprise their performances in this theater gala, directed by Tony Nicosia, Jr. 78, with a crew made up almost entirely of Marywood graduates.
1989

Marywood begins naming scholarships for individuals who have contributed significantly to the life of the College, October 6. First honorees are Dr. Ralph Bernardi, Mr. Francisco Borja, Sister Angela Hughes, Ms. Helen Leonard, Sister Reginald Patterson, and Mr. David Tressler.
1989

The College Board of Trustees adopts a recommendation from Sister Mary Reap that Marywood, as of fall 1990, provide housing on campus for all of its full-time student populations, including male undergraduates and graduate students of both genders, October 21. While this decision adds residence opportunities for graduate female students, the move to on-campus housing for male students represents an indirect but genuine declaration of coeducation at Marywood. A seventeen-member faculty task force has spent six months viewing the step from all perspectives, including those of every component of the College community. The group finds popular support for the proposal and also concludes that its implementation will serve several of Marywood s strategic goals, particularly those of increased enrollment and retention of students, broadened cultural diversity, and enhanced academic quality. Male students enrolled through the Gillet School, but nevertheless enrolled already form twenty-seven percent of the undergraduate population.
1989

The Cultural Affairs Committee sponsors an appearance by Neal Sheehan, author and war correspondent,Fall.
1989

Students, faculty and staff members participate in a two-day effort to fight hunger, poverty, and homelessness throughout the world, October 26-27. Students express their concern for the homeless by conducting a sleepout on campus.
1989

"Women Making A Difference," a two-day symposium, takes place on campus; the keynote address is given by Betty Williams, Nobel Peace Prize recipient, October 27-28. Eleanor: A Celebration, written to celebrate the 100th birthday of Eleanor Roosevelt, is performed at Marywood, starring Toni Gillman, veteran New York and Hollywood actress.
1989

The Marywood College Players present Fiddler on the Roof in celebration of the fortieth anniversary of musical theater productions at Marywood College, November 3-5.
1989

Sister Mary Reap, I.H.M., is elected to the Board of Directors of Moses Taylor Hospital, November 15.
1989

A Diocesan Social Justice Convocation is held in the Performing Arts Center; the keynote address, "The Holy Spirit and the Quality of our Public Life," is given by Rev. John Haughey, S.J.; Sister Margaret Gannon speaks on "Christian Feminism: The Challenge to Parish and Society," November 18.
1989

Students at Marywood College conduct a prayer service in memory of clerics and lay people who died because of the violence in El Salvador, November 30.
1989

Governor Robert P. Casey presses his case for increased attention to the problems of children in Pennsylvania at the closing session of a seminar featuring internationally-known educator and pediatrician Dr. T. Berry Brazleton, December 5.
1989

The Marywood Harp Ensemble presents in concert, commemorating seventy-five years of harp instruction at the College, December 10.
1989

Sister Mary Reap, I.H.M., serves on the Board of Directors of the Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce.
1989

Sister Mary Reap, I.H.M., serves on the Board of Directors of the United Nations Association of Greater Scranton.
1989

The Off-Campus Degree Program gains recognition in the Guide to Non-traditional College Degrees as one of the most reputable of its kind.
1989

Marywood College s women s basketball team is officially declared the NCAA Division III three-point field goal champion for the 1988-1989 season.
1989

The Institutional Planning Office relocates to the first floor of Immaculata Hall.
1989

The School of Continuing Education occupies offices vacated by Management Information Systems and Instutional Planning.
c.1989

Marywood issues a position paper affirming that victims of AIDS will suffer no discrimination in their associations with the College.
c.1989

The library in the Learning Resources Center contains 177,000 volumes, 1,200 periodical titles, 25,000 microforms, and 3,500 non-print items. It handles over 75,000 transactions a year and is in the enviable position of lending more than it borrows through the interlibrary loan system.
1989-1990

Marywood is chosen to participate in the Sears, Roebuck Foundation s Teacher Excellence and Campus Leadership Award Program, which provides a financial bonus to both the selected educator and his or her college. The first recipient of the prize at Marywood is Barbara Hoffman of the English Department.
1989-1990

Tuition and fees average $6,600 per year, nearly $2,000 per year less than the average at similar private institutions.