Mother M. Germaine ONeill Mother M. Casimir Murray Mother Mary William Craig Mother M. Josepha Hurley Sister M. Marcella Gill Sister M. Sylvia Morgan Sister M. Eugenia Kealey Sister M. St. Mary Orr Sister M. Coleman Nee Sister Mary Reap Sister Anne Munley
<< 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 >>
1984

The Rosary Field House, built in the early 1950s, is incorporated into a dramatic modernization juxtaposing the disciplines of athletics and art. The combined Visual Arts and Health and Physical Education Centers a $5.2 million complex are dedicated by Bishop McCormick, October 13. The new structure proves to be one of the most dazzling features of the campus. The Visual Arts Center, built adjacent to the original Field House but with its own entrance, contains the Contemporary Gallery, featuring exhibits by visiting artists, faculty, and students, and the Suraci Gallery, with the permanent art collection of the College. The outer east wall of the two galleries is concave and sheathed in sixteen mirrored panels which project multiple reflections of the campus and the nearby Shrine of St. Joseph. Inside are classrooms, offices, and lecture halls, with all of the Art Department s graduate and undergraduate facilities (except the Studio s) assembled for the first time in a single location: printing, sculpture, graphic design, photography, jewelry, ceramics, computer graphics, and textile art. The Health and Physical Education Center has been renovated and enlarged, with its gymnasium expanded to seat one thousand spectators. Racquetball courts, an athletic training room, team rooms, classrooms, offices, and a dance studio are added. A pedestrian arcade is designed for the fronts of both the Health and Art Centers, linking the two structures visually and physically. This novel plan, joining a new building to an older one and making both more impressive by the merger, is the work of architects Leung, Hemmler, Camayd of Scranton.
1984

The Department of Mathematics begins to offer a major in Computer Science.
1984

The Marywood Players perform Camelot.
1984

The Education Department merges its undergraduate and graduate programs due to decreased enrollment, a move to be reversed when circumstances change later in the decade.
1984

When the Diocese of Scranton s Bishop O Connor is appointed to the Archdiocese of New York City, the Most Reverend James C. Timlin, Auxiliary Bishop of Scranton, succeeds to the local position.
1984

Sister Coleman receives an honorary doctorate at the commencement of The University of Scranton.
1984

A pre-summer session for undergraduates is implemented, similar to the Winterim, which ended in 1980. It is a four-week intensive study period in which one course may be completed prior to the regular summer session. Eventually the summer schedule evolves into two five-week sessions.
1984

The Art Department s chairperson, Sister M. Cor Immaculatum Heffernan, I.H.M., directs a Humanities Program at the Lackawanna County Prison in Scranton. Sponsored by the Pennsylvania Humanities Council, the effort arranges classes for inmates in literature, expressive writing, art, and music, all taught by Marywood faculty members.
1984

The campus newspaper wins a first place certificate in the Columbia Scholastic Press Association competition, Fall.
1984

The purpose of Marywood College is expressed in its Catalog for the first time under the three separate headings which persist up to the present: mission statement, goals, and objectives.
1984

Art Gallery and Museum pieces are moved into the Suraci Gallery in the Visual Arts Center.