Chronological History of Marywood

Mother M. Germaine ONeill Mother M. Casimir Murray Mother Mary William Craig Mother M. Josepha Hurley Sister M. Marcella Gill Sister M. Sylvia Morgan Sister M. Eugenia Kealey Sister M. St. Mary Orr Sister M. Coleman Nee Sister Mary Reap Sister Anne Munley
<< 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 >>
1980

Marywood College embarks on an important long-range development program Marywood Horizons a carefully planned and organized effort to provide for the College s continued academic and physical growth. Key areas of financial need are identified: physical plant improvement and new construction, increased endowment, scholarship funds, and annual funds for operating support.
1980

Sister Dolores M. Filicko, I.H.M., is appointed Secretary of the College, June 7.
1980

The Board of Trustees establishes the Marywood Gillet School as a nonresidential, coeducational unit offering a baccalaureate degree, all off-campus undergraduate programs, certificate programs, and other nondegree education,October 4. The title honors Rev. Louis Florent Gillet, C.S.S.R., cofounder of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary.
1980

The Religious Studies Department operates a three-track major which serves a diversity of students, from those preparing to enter some form of Church Ministry to those investigating religion as a phenomenon. Field experience is arranged for department majors in local Catholic high schools, at the Fatima Center, and with the Scranton Team Ministry.
1980

Nearly five hundred students compose the freshman class, the largest entering group to date, and Marywood is once again the largest independent Catholic women s college in the United States, Fall.
1980

For its undergraduate enrollment of more than two thousand, Business Administration, Social Science, Human Ecology, Communications, and special Education rank as the five most popular major choices, Fall.
1980

The College launches another capital funds campaign, called Marywood Horizons, October. Planned to span the decade in three three-year phases devoted to expansion, endowment, and scholarships, the financial goal of the drive is $9 million.
1980

Sister M. Coleman Nee, I.H.M., is named a Distinguished Pennsylvanian.
1980

Dr. Barbara Burkhouse of the Education Department is named first Dean of the newly established Gillet School,December 22.
1980

The Winterim session is offered for the last time.
1980s

Numerous options are available for degree-seekers: the early admission program, permitting students to begin college work after completing the junior year of high school, provided that they fulfill all entry requirements; the accelerated sequence, enabling academically outstanding high school students to start earning Marywood credits through courses in summer and during their senior year; the modified program, easing qualified but tentative students into the college routine through a twelve-credit load which includes instruction in basic English, academic skills, and study habits; Project GREAT (Gradual Re-entry for Adults in Transition), in which the evaluation of mature students college records is deferred until fifteen credits are completed, affording them time to utilize campus support services in developing their capabilities. For those whose SAT scores or high school class rank is not up to standard, there is the Act 101 Realization of Ability Potential Program. It gives students whose potential is not yet matched by performance the chance to demonstrate their true ability at the college level through selected courses.
1980s

Many campus support services are offered at Marywood. Pastoral counseling is available at all times for religious and spiritual problems, and non-Catholics are provided with references to local ministers and rabbis. Diagnostic hearing and speech services are offered free to all. The Counseling Center administers a variety of self-appraisal inventories on an optional basis, including intelligence, aptitude, and personality tests. Resident counselors and advisors smooth the transition to dormitory life, and a flock of energetic peer tutors are available to coach students encountering difficulties in particular courses. The aptly named group OARS (Organization of Adult Returning Students) helps non-traditional students maneuver past their particular problems, which range from handling stress to securing baby-sitters.
1980s

A cooperative program with Indiana University of Pennsylvania enables students in its doctoral program to earn almost half their required credits at Marywood.
1980s

The College faculty achieve two long-sought goals: establishing a Faculty Senate to represent its interests and its views, and securing a small room in the Liberal Arts Center to serve as a social lounge for professors.
1980s

As a graphic reminder of its identity, Marywood starts to display more conspicuously the College logo, developed during sessions of the Curriculum Committee nearly twenty years earlier. This logo, symbolizing Marywood, consists of three stylized trees in a row, with the central, cross-embellished one partly overlapping the other two. The logo begins to appear regularly on college stationery, brochures, and other printed material. It has long been featured in the Catalog, which describes it as follows: The symbol of Marywood College strikes a humanistic approach, the essence of which is science and literature fused with philosophy, truth, and beauty bound by goodness. In the trunks of the trees (three for the Holy Trinity) we see an expression of constancy and growth. The wood the wood of the cross reminds us of the salvation from which we should build our strength, our character.
1980s

Marywood starts the 1980s with a five-year plan to improve the administrative computer system and, in accord with the long tradition of sharing knowledge while acquiring it, the College is soon training teachers and students of the Scranton Diocese in the Logo computer language. This effort is made possible through a $34,000 grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Education, one of only sixty awarded to nearly four hundred applicant institutions.
1980s

The Academic Computing Center is activated, with a Prime 400 computer and twenty terminals at various campus sites. Drop-in facilities are provided for word processing, programming, and other course assignments requiring the use of software. Eighty microcomputers are distributed among the residence halls, the library, and the academic offices. Academic Computing also sponsors workshops to train Marywood faculty and students in introductory and advanced computer techniques. To encourage machine proficiency, the Center maintains a collection of data sets for general use and supervises a computer-purchase program with discounts for members of the College community.
1980s

Visiting speakers include Jacques-Ives Cousteau, oceanologist; John F. Kennedy, Jr., campaigning for his uncle, Senator Edward Kennedy; Loren Hollander, pianist-lecturer; Father Avery Dulles, S.J., theologian; Donald Woods, anti-apartheid journalist from South Africa; Ralph Nader, consumer advocate; and Joyce Carol Oates, novelist and poet.
1980s

All campus structures are equipped for the handicapped by the installation of entrance ramps, elevators, curb cuts, special parking spaces, and lowered drinking fountains.
1980s

The Fine Arts building becomes the Performing Arts Center.
1980s

Nazareth hall becomes the Student Center.
1980s

Good Counsel Science Hall becomes the Science Center.
1980s

The Liberal Arts building becomes the Liberal Arts Center.
1980s

The Business Department is the largest in the College throughout the decade and one of the most cosmopolitan, as students in the International Business sequence complete part of their studies in Spain or France.
1980s

In the Department of Psychology Sister Gail Cabral, I.H.M., wins a grant for summer study from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
1980s

In the Department of Psychology Raymond Martinetti s dream research attracts attention in both campus and professional circles.
1980s

The Department of Foreign Languages, under the leadership of chairperson Mary Elizabeth Mallow Kenny, acquires a satellite dish for the Learning Resources Center, through which students have access to worldwide television broadcasts in a variety of languages.
1980s

Sister Mary Reap, while still a member of the Department of Foreign Languages, participates in the English Language Exchange Program at the Huazhong Institute of Technology in Wuhan Hubei, China, teaching English to Chinese scientists.
1980s

The Human Ecology Department begins an extern program for majors in the Hotel Restaurant Administration Program. In this six-credit course, students work a forty-hour week behind the scenes at the College cafeteria, supervised by John Osmun, veteran manager of the Marywood Dining Services, Sister Maureen Schrimpe, I.H.M., Director, and John Mellon of the Human Ecology faculty.
1980s

Two Dietetics seniors are awarded stipends for graduate study: Kim Rokita receives a Truman Fellowship, and Colleen O Rourke wins a Rotary Fellowship.
1980s

The Department of Mathematics, along with George Washington University in Washington, D.C., offers a dual degree program in Mathematics/Engineering. The sequence balances studies in the liberal arts and science and requires three years at Marywood and two years at George Washington. Participating students receive a Bachelor of Science Degree in Mathematics from Marywood College and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Engineering from George Washington University. The program ends in 1987, when the Department decides to focus its energies on its major in Computer Science.
1980s

Sister Robert Ann von Ahnen coordinates the annual math contests sponsored by the Mathematics Department for area high school students.
1980s

Two members of the Philosophy faculty, William Mohan and Michael Foley, with Sister Dorothy Haney, I.H.M., win a total of five National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships.
1980s

Every program offered by the Education Department undergoes review to ensure that students are prepared to pass the new certification examinations required by Pennsylvania as of June 1, 1987, for all entering the teaching profession.
1980s

A competitive state grant funds a microcomputer lab, and interactive video hardware and software are added to the Education Department s resources.
1980s

Education Department member Sister Frances Russell, I.H.M., is elected president of the Keystone State Reading Association.
1980s

The area s first chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America is formed at Marywood, giving students the opportunity to practice their public relations skills with local organizations while still attending college. By working with professionals in the business community, students assimilate valuable practical experience and acquire a vital network of career contracts. The group gets off to an energetic start, winning three awards during its first year: one for University Service and two District Director citations.
1980s

The Student Hotel and Restaurant Association begins in conjunction with the newest sequence in the Human Ecology Department, Hotel and Restaurant Administration.
1980s

The campus newspaper undergoes another change of name, from Genesis to The Wood Word.
1980s

Most Marywood students volunteer time to support causes they believe in. Many participate in seminars and workshops sponsored by L Arche in behalf of better understanding the disabled. Others join faculty, administration, and staff in the Renew program, a six-week session of small group faith sharing and larger organized activities geared to nurture the spiritual development of those involved. The Theresa Maxis Center for Justice and Peace also attracts its share of concerned students. Cosponsored by Marywood College and the Congregation of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, the organization operates on two levels of social involvement: educating the public about contemporary issues related to peace and justice, and encouraging effective citizen response to government proposals regarding such issues.