Chronological History of Marywood

Mother M. Germaine ONeill Mother M. Casimir Murray Mother Mary William Craig Mother M. Josepha Hurley Sister M. Marcella Gill Sister M. Sylvia Morgan Sister M. Eugenia Kealey Sister M. St. Mary Orr Sister M. Coleman Nee Sister Mary Reap Sister Anne Munley
<< 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 >>
1978

The Marywood Players perform Mame and The Heiress.
1978

By this time nearly twelve hundred students have participated in Marywood and the International Correspondence Schools college without walls program, meeting the same standards that apply on campus and fulfilling residence requirements by means of two two-week sessions. The Carnegie Foundation is funding similar programs at major universities throughout the Midwest, pursuing an educational direction that Marywood was the first to explore in 1972.
1978

The Marywood Bubble opens on the eastern border of the campus behind the Marian Convent and is blessed by Rev. William Campbell, Chaplain, June 14. It is a vinyl structure, supported by air, encapsulating six tennis courts, permitting year-round play for both students and area subscribers.
1978

The option of dual certification in both elementary and special education a popular choice among students comes to an end. The latter becomes a separate department, providing certification in five areas of disability: emotional disturbance, mental retardation, physical handicaps, learning disabilities, and brain damage. By this time liaisons exist between the College and Allied Services for the Handicapped, the United Cerebral Palsy Home, and the Allied Services and Viewmont Mall Group Homes, through which Marywood majors in Special Education gain practicum experiences in teaching functional reading and math skills to adults. In addition, St. Joseph s Center supplies opportunities for work with multi-handicapped pre-school children.
1978

Sister Patricia Ann Matthews, I.H.M., chairperson of the Department of Social Sciences from 1973 to 1978, leaves the Department to become the Dean of the Undergraduate School, and Sister Margaret Gannon, I.H.M., succeeds her. Both Sisters, graduates of the Marywood Social Sciences Department, contribute much to the Department s cross-curricular direction during the 1970s. The Pennsylvania Department of Education notes this trend during an evaluation, citing the Department of History and Social Sciences for developing a model of interdisciplinary experiences. The structure of the faculty, the leadership and belief of the department chairperson all contribute to this excellent situation.
1978

The Business Department, chaired by Samir Dagher, utilizes a grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Education to set up two simulated work environments in which students can experience, on campus, some of the realities of the business world. The Individualized Secretarial Center and Information Systems Center ease the transition between the classroom and the workplace. To reflect its increased scope, the Department s title is expanded to include Managerial Science.
1978

The initial class of twenty-two nurses from the first phase of Marywood s Bachelor of Science in Nursing program graduates, May.
1978

A major change takes place at the administrative level of the College when Sister Michel Keenan, Vice President for Academic Affairs, is elected Superior General of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. Sister M. Espiritu Dempsey, I.H.M., assumes the Vice Presidency, and Sister Patricia Ann Matthews, I.H.M., succeeds Sister Espiritu as Dean of the Undergraduate School.
1978

Tuition is $1,800 a year ($60 per credit), and room and board cost $1,500 a year.
1978

The Woodland Apartments are dedicated, providing less formal housing for some of the underclassmen, October 29. Each of the three buildings contains four apartments for students.
1978

By this time, sixty-four liberal arts credits are required for a degree, and they are divided into four broad categories: The Human Condition in Its Ultimate Relationships Religion and Philosophy; The Human Condition in the Context of the Physical Universe Mathematics and Science; The Human Condition in Relation to Self and the Social Structure Psychology, History, and Social Science; and The Human Condition in Its Cultural Context World and Classical Literature, Modern Languages, and Fine Arts.