Chronological History of Marywood

Mother M. Germaine ONeill Mother M. Casimir Murray Mother Mary William Craig Mother M. Josepha Hurley Sister M. Marcella Gill Sister M. Sylvia Morgan Sister M. Eugenia Kealey Sister M. St. Mary Orr Sister M. Coleman Nee Sister Mary Reap Sister Anne Munley
<< 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 >>
1975

During the Winterim, thirty-three students of the Music Department tour Germany, Austria, and Luxemburg under the direction of Robert Herrema of the Music faculty. They give recitals at halls, churches, and schools, climaxing with a performance at the famed Mozartum in Salzburg.
1975

A Ceramics Studio is built to accommodate the nearly one hundred Art majors. It is a compact, one-story structure pre-engineered of sculptured steel and contains two kilns, a variety of potters wheels, areas for welding and sculpture, and glass display cases. It opens, September.
1975

The Marywood Cinematography Club s first musical, The Singing Sergeant, evokes the nostalgia of American movies of the World War II era with its depiction of a Savings Bond rally in the old Marywood gym and a lavish production number mounted and filmed in the Rotunda.
1975

Fifty Sisters are presented with a specially designed pin in recognition of twenty or more years of service to the College, April 5. For most of the Sisters, the tribute is long overdue because earlier Congregational protocol did not encourage such recognition. Now, however, a new perspective prevails, and fifty intentional omissions of the past are rectified.
1975

The first Office of Archives opens on the first floor of the Learning Resources Center so that Sister M. Cuthbert Donovan can begin the task of organizing the historical documents of the College. Sister M. Cuthbert continues this work until her death in 1988.
1975

The first televised course of the Programs in Adult and Continuing Education (PACE) is offered, as is the first course utilizing weekly articles in The Scranton Times, demonstrating ways in which the College reaches out by non-traditional methods to non-traditional students.
1975

The Music Department sponsors its first summer outdoor concerts, a series of five Sunday evening performances held on the Memorial Commons, free of charge to the public. One concert features the talents of students attending the Department s annual music camp, a popular attraction for young area musicians.
1975

Marywood celebrates its sixtieth anniversary, commemorated by a Pontifical Liturgy of Thanksgiving celebrated by Bishop McCormick, October 4. Later that day, the Memorial Commons is blessed and dedicated on the land where the Motherhouse had once dominated the campus. The Commons is a ninety-foot concrete circle with walkways extending outward to major campus areas. Sister Maria Laurence Maher, I.H.M., of the Biology Department, performs the symbolic planting of ivy in the large free-form granite monument taken in part from a shrine at St. Cecilia s Academy, the first I.H.M. Motherhouse in Scranton, which was also destroyed by fire in 1876. In this way, something from the far past is integrated into a new and very different focal point at the heart of the College campus. The monument bears the inscription: The Memorial marks the site of the first building erected at Marywood. It served both the general public and the Congregation of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. During the seven decades of its existence this remarkable structure served many missions. This historical building was destroyed by fire February 22, 1971. On it is carved a replica of the Motherhouse/Seminary Building that was destroyed by fire. An Anniversary Dinner is given afterward in Nazareth Hall, at which Sister Coleman awards Presidential Medals to Sister M. Cuthbert Donovan, Dean Emerita of the College; Sister M. St. Mary Orr, President Emerita; Mother M. Beata Wertz, I.H.M., former Superior General of the I.H.M. Congregation; and posthumously to John Murphy, Advisory Board member since 1960 and member of the Board of Trustees at the time of his death the preceding May.
1975

One of the English Department s graduating seniors, Marilyn Kralik, known as much for her haunting art work as for her exceptional literary talent, wins a major scholarship for graduate study at Pennsylvania State University.
1975

On its sixtieth anniversary, Marywood is an institution of imposing dimensions. Its nineteen buildings plus the hockey field, tennis courts, and commons sprawl out on one hundred acres. The physical plant has a value of $16 million with a total debt of only $2.7 million. The annual operating budget is $5.6 million, with $768,000 in services contributed by the Sisters. There are 210 faculty members, full- and part-time, forty-six administrators, 1,913 undergraduates, 892 graduate students, and 238 students in the Graduate School of Social Work.
1975

Marywood s commitment to undergraduate education for nurses takes on new dimensions. Begun through intensive non-degree courses during World War II in cooperation with area hospitals, the arrangement has developed into a comprehensive degree program. Its first phase accepts registered nurses in a study sequence leading to a Bachelor of Science in Nursing.
1975

By this time, tuition is $1,500 a year ($50 per credit), and room and board cost $1,300 a year.
1975

The Off-Campus Degree Program is established, providing an opportunity for adults to work toward a bachelor s degree in Accounting or Business Administration while fulfilling their other responsibilities.
1975

The campus becomes known as The Sister Maria Laurence Maher Arboretum in honor of one of Marywood s most avid environmental supporters, a Professor of Biological Sciences, thus recognizing the value of the woods of Marywood.
1975

Marywood cooperates with the U.S. Army in a program called "Project Ahead," which enables students to enlist in the service and enroll in the College at the same time.
1975

The campus is recognized by Pennsylvania Magazine as Most Beautiful Religiously-Affiliated Campus in Pennsylvania.