Chronology

Mother M. Germaine ONeill Mother M. Casimir Murray Mother Mary William Craig Mother M. Josepha Hurley Sister M. Marcella Gill Sister M. Sylvia Morgan Sister M. Eugenia Kealey Sister M. St. Mary Orr Sister M. Coleman Nee Sister Mary Reap Sister Anne Munley
<< 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 >>
1971

A proposal is made for a dramatic alteration in Marywood's future: a formal link with The University of Scranton. However, the proposal is not accepted as Marywood intends to maintain its position as a Catholic liberal arts College, dedicated to the education of youth and adults, chiefly women, with the graduate programs remaining coeducational, as they always have been. The College continues to admit, though not actively recruit, male commuters but has no plans to alter its emphasis.
1971

The Education Department is reaccredited by NCATE.
1971

Nearly one hundred years after the I.H.M. Sisters were establishing their Congregation in Scranton and opening St. Cecilia's Academy on Wyoming Avenue, in their centenary year and in spite of the fire, they prepare to open the new Psych-Educational Clinic at Marywood.
1971

The Council for Exceptional Children highlights its annual dinner with its first award for outstanding work in the field of special education, April. Joan Halstead, a senior, is selected for the honor on the basis of scholarship, service to the Council, her private work with exceptional children, and her development of a teacher-aide volunteer program at Keystone Training and Rehabilitation Residence.
1971

The Reverend Joseph Fadden succeeds the Reverend William Mellody as Chaplain.
1971

The graduate School of Social Work graduates its first class, May. Its faculty have increased to sixteen full-time and nine part-time members, and the School is awarded a three-year grant by the Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Foundation to study the social, psychological, and economic problems faced by the families of emotionally disabled children.
1971

Maria Hall (formerly the Science Building) becomes the Art Center.
1971

February
Before dawn, the first building on the Marywood campus the Motherhouse-Seminary, in which the College spent its initial decade is completely destroyed by a fire, February 22. The Motherhouse is home to nearly 120 Sisters, eight of whom are trapped on the fourth floor and forced to jump to the roof of the Seminary porch. Although several Sisters are hospitalized, there are no fatal injuries. Firefighters perform heroically, leading and carrying disabled Sisters to safety and vigilantly preventing sparks from igniting the main College buildings just across the driveway. Aid also comes from neighbors, Marywood students, and students from The University of Scranton, who rescue furniture, art work, and personal possessions from the encroaching flames, including the archives of the I.H.M. Congregation. Classes are cancelled until March 2 to clear the campus as the Sisters relocate in the Marian Convent and in vacant dormitory rooms. There is no thought of replacing the structure as a comparable building would be financially prohibitive. The chapel statue of the Blessed Mother is found intact after the fire, and, long after it is assumed to be destroyed, firefighters also discover the statue's irreplaceable jeweled crown.
1971

February
Soon after the fire that destroyed the Motherhouse, the space in Regina Hall that had been the formal dining room is transformed overnight into a temporary chapel.
1971

April
Most Rev. J. Carroll McCormick, D.D., blesses and dedicates the newly-constructed Psych-Educational Clinic on the site of the former Maloney Field at the corner of North Washington Avenue and University Streets, April 24. On a property adjacent to the College grounds and purchased for expansion purposes, it is a one-story, twenty-seven room structure with offices, diagnostic areas with one-way observation windows, and classrooms equipped for the study of speech therapy. The Clinic represents the final immediate project in Marywood's campus expansion plan.