Mother M. Germaine ONeill Mother M. Casimir Murray Mother Mary William Craig Mother M. Josepha Hurley Sister M. Marcella Gill Sister M. Sylvia Morgan Sister M. Eugenia Kealey Sister M. St. Mary Orr Sister M. Coleman Nee Sister Mary Reap Sister Anne Munley
<< 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 >>
1970

The Marywood Players perform The King and I.
1970

Regina Langan of the Business Department becomes the first lay person to serve as Dean of Students.
1970

An academic self-study leads to accreditation of three new teacher education sequences: Early Childhood, Computer science, and General Science. Three graduate programs are also approved: Psychology, Counselor Education, and Social Work.
1970

The Mathematics Department learns that one of its 1970 graduating seniors, Judith Tama, is awarded a Fulbright Fellowship for study in Germany during the following academic year.
1970

Sister M. Coleman Nee, I.H.M., becomes the ninth President of Marywood College.
1970

Sensing the temper of the times, Sister Coleman, from the start of her presidency, visits a different dormitory each week to hold a fireside chat with the residents. By keeping clear the lines of communication between her office and the students, Sister does her part to guarantee that legitimate grievances do not get lost at some intermediate level. Nevertheless, a single organized demonstration is held in Nazareth Hall, where students vent their opinions on a wide range of topics to assembled administrators, Spring.
1970

The addition to the Marian Convent is completed.
1970

Seventy-two liberal arts credits are required for a degree.
1970

Tuition is $1,200 a year ($40 per credit), and room and board cost $1,000 a year.
1970

The College facilities are housed in twenty buildings, acquired over the years in continuing expansion projects. Land acquisition has extended the campus boundaries to approximately 140 acres.
1970

By the fall of this year, upper division students in the Department of Theology are able to choose their two required courses from a field of ten. So diversified and wide in appeal are these offerings that all Marywoodians, including non-Catholics, are expected to fulfill the requirements in Religion courses instead of in substituted subjects.
1970-1985

The Marywood Cinematography Club channels the creative energies of majors of all departments in the production of fourteen movies. Music, costumes, sets, titles, filming, sound recording, and performances are supplied by students under the direction of Thomas Dempsey of the Biology Department faculty. A full-sound, black and white adaptation of Wuthering Heights calls into service the desolate culm dumps behind the campus tennis courts as a local substitute for the brooding British moorlands.
1970s

The Iota Sigma chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, the History honor society, is established at Marywood.
1970s

Earning a degree at Marywood includes many options: joint, double, and ad hoc majors; opportunity courses; independent study, informal seminars; television and correspondence courses; study abroad; and approved work experiences. Interdisciplinary courses utilizing team teaching show undergraduates the natural relationships between seemingly disparate disciplines.
1970s

By this time a Counseling Center, staffed by counselors, psychologists, clergymen, and academic advisors, provides valuable guidance to students of both the day and evening divisions.
1970s

The complexities of loans and scholarships are solved for applicants in a Financial Aid Office directed by Stanley Skrutski.
1970s

Students physical well-being is protected by a vigilant security team headed by John Verrone and by an efficient infirmary supervised by College Nurse Mary Alice McGraw.
1970s

The campus buildings are kept fit and functional by Plant Superintendent Daniel Sileo and a team of helpers; and the housekeeping staff, with members like Rose Manarano, tends to the interior upkeep of the campus structures.
1970s

An office for Institutional Research and Data Analysis opens, headed by Sister Marian Flannery, I.H.M., to investigate enrollment trends, demographics, and students choices of majors and to transcribe the information into easily interpreted charts and graphs for administrative use.
1970s

The Office of Business Affairs, guided by Assistant Treasurer Mary Smith, with the help of Mary Clarke, expedites its services as Marywood installs its first computer to access the student accounts system.
1970s

In the last catalogs of the 1970s, the Bishop of Scranton is no longer listed as the Honorary President of Marywood College.
1970s

The Marywood faculty and administration cooperate to produce a revised Faculty Manual, one of several versions required in subsequent years to codify and clarify College policies.
1970s

A Faculty Development Fund is implemented to provide financial assistance to professors engaged in specialized educational projects.
1970s

Lesley Frost, daughter of the poet Robert Frost, speaks at Marywood.
1970s

Pennsylvania Governor William Scranton speaks at Marywood.
1970s

Elie Wiesel, writer and lecturer on the holocaust, speaks at Marywood.
1970s

Ann Marie Greco of the Social Sciences Department becomes Marywood s first woman faculty member to give an address at the summer commencement.
1970s

The Department of Home Economics becomes known by its revised name, the Department of Human Ecology.
1970s

Communication Disorders, until now an adjunct of the Department of Communication Arts, assumes the status of a separate department, headed by Michael Flahive.
1970s

The American Dietetics Association approves the new four-year coordinated program between Marywood and the Charles S. Wilson Memorial Hospital in Johnson City, New York. Funded by a W. K. Kellogg Foundation grant of $170,000, the venture enables majors in Dietetics to complete degree requirements in four years rather than five.
1970s

The demonstrations at Kent State and the war in Vietnam evoke sympathy and empathy in many Marywoodians, symbolized by the black arm bands that they decide to wear.
1970s

No decade at the school witnesses more activity in the areas of personal religious development and public humanitarianism. Students take part in Twilight Retreats, Charismatic Prayer Groups, Bible Vigils, Friday Night Vespers, Ecumenical Peace Sabbaths, Nights of Prayer, and Clown Mime Services. They support Genesis II Experiencing Religion, a film discussion series conducted by the Reverend Vincent Dwyer, O.C.S.O., a Trappist Monk. They attend re-entry Masses, held at odd hours for the benefit of students who spend Sundays traveling back to Marywood, and they participate in Breakaway Sessions, in which small groups share experiences on a spiritual topic proposed by a moderator. When it comes to helping and sharing with others, Marywoodians also are selfless in energy. They race in Bike-a-thons and Walk-a-thons and Swim-a-thons for the American Cancer Society, the Diabetes Association, and the March of Dimes. Bread for the World becomes a campus cause, and the students provide more than bread to local hungry families through donations to the Scranton Christmas Bureau. The Campus Ministry sponsors the Marionettes, who voluntarily work with the aged at the Marian Convent and Holy Family Residence. Students participate in Operation Rice Bowl during Lent, forgoing a meal once a week and donating the equivalent cost to the cause of the hungry, locally and world-wide. So generously do Marywood students support such activities that a Volunteer Service Center is established to coordinate the clubs charitable endeavors, ensuring that worthwhile causes are brought to the attention of the groups most suited to assist them.
1970s

The Department of Classical and Modern Languages represents a merger of two departments. Although nearly all students during the 1970s choose a modern language rather than an ancient one, Marywood, with its Latin motto, its devotion to liturgical singing, its long association with the Latin Mass, and its classically educated lay and religious faculty, keeps Latin and Greek in its curriculum until demand for them entirely disappears. The classics in translation, however, are never allowed to vanish.
1970s

Part of the former kitchens in Regina Hall become a lounge for graduate students and staff, and the third floor of the Novitiate is remodeled to house Sisters displaced by the fire for whom there were not enough vacant dormitory rooms.
1970s

The Department of Social Sciences initiates a program in Legal Studies and one in undergraduate Social Work.
1970s

An affiliation with Allied Services for the Handicapped in Scranton permits juniors in the Department of Human Ecology s Community Nutrition course to intern at the Allied rehabilitation complex and gain practical experience in purchasing and preparing food for the six hundred people served at the facility.
1970s

The undergraduate Education Department is now located in the Center for Human Services, with Sister M. Carina McCaffrey, I.H.M., chairperson, leading the way to CBTE (Competency Based Teacher Education). Department member Barbara Burkhouse visits Weber State College in Utah to observe this methodology in action, after which the Education faculty establish a competency profile of Marywood graduates. Programs are tailored to develop these competencies, and criteria are defined to measure their attainment.
1970s

The English Department generates a writing course for legal students to develop communication skills in future lawyers.
1970s

The Education curriculum implements micro-teaching, described by the Department as a scaled-down teaching encounter, which constitutes a real teaching experience, reduced in the number of students, time, and objectives. Marywood Education majors are taped on campus in micro-teaching sessions, with students from nearby St. Clare s school in Green Ridge participating as members of the miniature classes.
1970s

The Philosophy Club is established at Marywood.
1970s

The Academy Club is established at Marywood for undergraduate and graduate students in the fields of the Social Sciences and sponsors a number of panel discussions with community leaders and forums on current affairs.