Chronological History of Marywood

Mother M. Germaine ONeill Mother M. Casimir Murray Mother Mary William Craig Mother M. Josepha Hurley Sister M. Marcella Gill Sister M. Sylvia Morgan Sister M. Eugenia Kealey Sister M. St. Mary Orr Sister M. Coleman Nee Sister Mary Reap Sister Anne Munley
<< 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 >>
1950

Antigone is performed at Marywood.
1950

The College s first professional audit is conducted by Public Accountant-Auditor Joseph Rocereto. For fiscal year 1949-50, College revenues total $456,550, exceeding by $61,541 the expenditures of $395,009. Plant funds, which represent the College's cumulative investment in the campus facilities, total $2,737,603. The appraised value of Marywood s land, buildings, and contents is $2,666,958. Marywood s endowment stands at $6,199. The contributed services of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, amount to $144,445.
1950

Sister M. Eugenia Kealey launches Marywood's first fund drive, with a goal of $2 million dollars for four new campus buildings.
1950

Bishop William J. Hafey breaks ground for four new buildings the largest expansion program in the history of the College, October 7. Work begins simultaneously on all four structures: Alumnae Residence Hall, renamed Immaculata Hall in 1954; Good Counsel Science Hall, a three-story building to contain a 150-seat lecture hall/science auditorium/movie theater, named the Comerford Theater in honor of its donors, owners of an area movie theater chain; Rosary Field House, to contain the largest collegiate pool in the East; and Assumption Hall, to house the Fine Arts and the 1,200-seat auditorium. The architects are Henry D. Dagit and Sons, Philadelphia. For the construction of Assumption Hall, better known as the Fine Arts building, Marywood expands across the street, incorporating the new site into the campus by demolishing the stone wall along Adams Avenue that had marked the previous boundary line.
1950s

The curriclum evolves into two components known as the lower and upper divisions or biennia.
1950s

The grade system again alters slightly and stays that way through the 1950s, eliminating the A+ and reinstating the A to cover 95-100. A C- covers the grades 70-74.
1950s

Louis de Wahl, author, lectures at Marywood.
1950s

Walter Kerr, Professor of Drama at Catholic University, lectures at Marywood.
1950s

Tom Dooley, a medical doctor whose mission to Vietnam preceded American involvement there, lectures at Marywood.
1950s

The Student Government Association donates a statue of St. Maria Goretti for the student lounge in the Liberal Arts building.
1950s

Freshmen are expected to wear their identifying beanies at all possible times; seniors are distinguished by their trademark green blazers.
1950s

Candle Night, a ceremony within the graduation exercises, is celebrated at Marywood. Students, attired in caps and gowns and carrying lighted candles, form a procession around the campus walks, singing the alma mater and other traditional songs. Underclassmen's tassels are turned to the right, and juniors wear their newly acquired green tassels.