Mother M. Germaine ONeill Mother M. Casimir Murray Mother Mary William Craig Mother M. Josepha Hurley Sister M. Marcella Gill Sister M. Sylvia Morgan Sister M. Eugenia Kealey Sister M. St. Mary Orr Sister M. Coleman Nee Sister Mary Reap Sister Anne Munley
<< 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 >>
1930

The Tourmaline earns an honor rating from the National Scholastic Press Association in the category of colleges with more than five hundred students.
1930-1931

The Hoban-Lucas Gallery opens in a large room on the mezzanine of the Liberal Arts Building.
1930s

Marywood earns accreditation by the American Dietetic Association; the Pennsylvania State Board of Law Examiners; the Bureau of Professional Education (for the pre-medical course); the American Council of Education; the Association of American Colleges; the Carnegie Association for the Advancement of Teaching; and the Catholic Educational Association of Pennsylvania. Marywood also becomes a member of the National Catholic Educational Association and an associate member of the Association of University Women.
1930s

Students hear lectures by Thomas Finnegan, State Superintendent of Education; Cornelia Otis Skinner, author-actress; the Reverend Francis (later Cardinal) Spellman; and Dom Vernon Moore, a Benedictine scholar.
1930s

The Liberal Arts building is repainted, refloored, and equipped with new desks. Its former assembly hall is divided into three sections and devoted to classes in ancient and modern languages. The area of the Art Department is refurbished, and the Drama Department space is converted into a "little theater" facility.
1930s

The English Department establishes the Beta chapter of Lambda Iota Tau, the international honor society for students of literature.
1930s

Clubs relating to majors include the St. Luke's Art Society and a Library Science Club.
1930s

Der Marienwald Verein and El Circulo Espanol de Santa Teresa consist of the students of German and Spanish, andIl Circolo Dante Alighieri and the Italian Club represent students of Italian, the former expressly for those of Italian descent.
1930s

An International Relations Club forms and hosts at Marywood a conference of the Catholic Students' Peace Foundation of the Middle Atlantic States.
1930s

Marywood students attend a talk given by Rear Admiral Richard Byrd at the Masonic Temple. There they meet the Reverend Bernard Hubbard, S.J., also an arctic explorer, and the members of the Secretarial Club become his unofficial and official patrons. Under the guidance of Sister M. St. Agnes Moran, I.H.M., they sponsor his numerous appearances on campus in lecture/film dramatizations of his experiences in the remote polar regions as both secular trailblazer and religious missionary. The club eventually and painstakingly types an Eskimo dictionary to help Father Hubbard, fondly known to them as "the Glacier Priest." Father Hubbard discovers and names a lake after the College: Lake Marywood. He also carries Marywood's banner during a flight over the North Pole and presents the school with a living memento of this exotic region, a pair of Alaskan Huskies named Damon and Pythias. Marywood later becomes the eastern distribution center for Father Hubbard Educational Films.
1930s

The Marywood Athletic Association sponsors sports competitions, including gymnastics, tennis, hockey, basketball, volleyball, and golf.
1930s

Four music groups are thriving: the Liturgical Society, devoted to the preservation of Gregorian Chant; the St. Cecilia Musical Society, cultivating a more general appreciation of music and its literature; the Cecilian Glee Club for those who simply love to sing; and the Marywood orchestra for those with instrumental talents.
1930s

Campus publications include the Science Department's Baconite quarterly; the Commercial Department'sCommercial Leaf; the Students' Spiritual Council's S.S.C. Newsletter; Trio, a review in Spanish, French, and Italian; and The Marywoodian, a newspaper that appears at irregular intervals.
1930s

A Council of Debate is formed; it persists through the 1960s.