A More Diverse Nation -----

ARE YOU PREPARED?

The non-Hispanic white population is projected to peak in 2024, at 199.6 million, up from 197.8 million in 2012. Unlike other race or ethnic groups, however, its population is projected to slowly decrease, falling by nearly 20.6 million from 2024 to 2060.

Meanwhile, the Hispanic population will more than double, from 53.3 million in 2012 to 128.8 million in 2060. Consequently, by the end of the period, nearly one in three U.S. residents will be Hispanic, up from about one in six today.

In order to thoroughly prepare tomorrow’s health professionals “schools of nursing and medicine…are contemplating adding a foreign language requirement to their curriculum.  In fact, some nursing programs have already recognized the value of bilingualism and are offering courses in Medical Spanish,” (Kalist 115). 

Marywood is far ahead of the curve, having taught an elementary class in Spanish for Health Professionals since the 1990s.  However the Foreign Languages Department soon realized that most of our nursing students were too advanced in their Spanish skills for an elementary course.  Therefore, in 2013 we introduced an intermediate level Medical Spanish (SPAN 399) taught by a practicing registered nurse to better serve our students.

Your prior experience with Spanish determines the courses you study.  Students beginning their foreign language at the 223 level or beyond can earn a minor with only five (5) courses (15 total).  Students beginning at an Intermediate Level (211, 212) require 18 credits total. Besides Medical Spanish, we suggest Conversational Spanish (SPAN 275), The Latino Condition in the U.S. (SPAN 350), Contemporary Hispanic Issues (SPAN 310) or a survey course or literature course. A summer session abroad not only immerses students in language and culture, but also can guarantee graduation in four years.   

Contact the Foreign Languages Department before your first semester so that we can help you plan your personalized academic schedule.   We can guarantee that you will be better prepared to serve all your patients. 

Kalist, David E. "Registered Nurses and the Value of Bilingualism." Cornell University ILRReview 59.1 (2005): 99-118. Cornell University. 1 Oct. 2005. Web. 27 Mar. 2014.  <website>.

 

Nusing Majors with Spanish Minor

Recommended Course of Study

A. The student beginning Spanish classes at the 211 level should take the following 6 courses to complete an 18 credit minor:

  • Spanish 211 – Intermediate Spanish I
  • Spanish 212 – Intermediate Spanish II
  • Spanish 223 or Spanish 300 (Spanish for Reading and Review / Intensive Grammar – depending on student proficiency level)
  • Spanish 275 – Conversational Spanish
  • Spanish 307* – Advanced Medical Spanish
  • Spanish 310, 325 or 350 – (Contemporary Hispanic Issues, Latin American Culture and Civilization or The Latino Condition in the U.S. – depending on course offerings)


B. The student beginning Spanish classes at the 223 level should take the following 5 courses to complete a 15 credit minor:

  • Spanish 223 – Spanish for Reading and Review
  • Spanish 300 – Intensive Grammar
  • Spanish 275 – Conversational Spanish
  • Spanish 307*– Advanced Medical Spanish
  • Spanish 310, 325 or 350 – (Contemporary Hispanic Issues, Latin American Culture and Civilization or The Latino Condition in the U.S. – depending on course offerings)


C. Student beginning Spanish classes above the 223 level should take the following 5 courses to complete a 15 credit minor:

  • Spanish 300 – Intensive Grammar
  • Spanish 307*– Advanced Medical Spanish
  • Spanish 275 – Conversational Spanish
  • Spanish 310 or 350 – (Contemporary Hispanic Issues or The Latino Condition in the U.S. – depending on course offerings)
  • Spanish 325 – Latin American Culture and Civilization 

 

NOTE: Substitutions for these recommended courses may be warranted, however any substitutions must be approved by the Foreign Languages Department.