Social Sciences Courses

Code Course Name Description Credits
CJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice All components of the criminal justice system are reviewed and their interrelationships assessed. Empirical descriptions and tests of effectiveness of the various segments of the system are covered. 3
CJ 101 Shadow and Service This course provides an opportunity to, first, shadow a criminal justice professional and, second, to serve the community from which criminal justice clientele are drawn. May be taken after or with CJ 100. 3
CJ 105 Forensic Analytical Techniques Outlines the general techniques in forensic analysis. Emphasis on sample collection and preservation, forensic terminology and procedure, and analytical techniques and theory. The student will perform several forensic and analytical laboratory techniques. Lecture and practical laboratory experience. 3
CJ 200 Introduction to Law Provides an overview of the basic areas of law and mechanics of legal research. The case study method is used. 3
CJ 201 The Juvenile Justice Subsystem The legal history of the development of a separate criminal justice system for juveniles through English common law to the present. The role of juveniles as a subcomponent of the larger criminal justice system. Particular attention is given to the problem of interfacing the juvenile system with the overall system. 3
CJ 206 Community Corrections Origins of the probation system are considered. Current standards are reviewed and assessed at federal, state, and local levels, as well as standards for parole and aftercare. 3
CJ 219 Drugs in American Society Considers the causes and consequences of recreational use and misuse of psychoactive substances: narcotics, alcohol, psychedelics, and "club drugs". Analyzes current legal/correctional and treatment approaches to America's problem with drugs in comparative, historical, and cross-cultural perspectives. 3
CJ 220 Law Enforcement An introduction to major trends and issues in law enforcement. The course includes such topics as the history of police organizations, their contemporary operation, the legal framework in which they operate, police behavior, and police-community relations. 3
CJ 302 White Collar Crime This course examines white collar crime. Typically, these are fraudulent acts committed within commercial situations by individuals or corporations for financial gain -- e.g., bribery, computer and internet fraud, embezzlement, environmental crime, money laundering, tax evasion. The causes and consequences of such criminal conduct are examined, as well as efforts by criminal justice agencies to control it. Specific cases will be examined. 3
CJ 303 Criminology Focuses on crime and delinquency as a major social problem in the United States. Evaluates theories of crime and delinquency in terms of current evidence for their support. 3
CJ 318 Family Law Covers laws governing marriage, divorce, annulment, support, custody, and adoption. 3
CJ 319 Criminal Law and Procedure Introduces the criminal justice system and the study of law dealing with criminal offenses. 3
CJ 322 Criminalistics and the Crime Lab This course provides a non-technical introduction to the uses of forensic science in crime scene investigation. Topics include such crime lab procedures as: microscopic analysis of hair, fiber and paint, forensic toxicology, forensic investigation of fire and explosion scenes, as well as the analysis of DNA, fingerprints, firearms, tool marks, documents, vocal records, and internet use. 3
CJ 324 Criminal Investigation An introduction to the field of criminal investigation, this course describes for a broad array of crimes how to document a crime scene, identify and collect evidence, and interview and arrest suspects. Important court cases will be reviewed throughout the semester. 3
CJ 330 Prosecuting Criminal Cases This course examines the process of prosecuting criminal offenders. It includes a consideration of the common legal requirements and the manner in which prosecutor, defense attorney, and other court officials together determine the outcome for arrested men and women. 3
CJ 351 Social Research Focuses on principles of methodology and techniques of research, the relationship between theory and research design, concept formation, measurement, data collection, and data analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 216. 3
CJ 360 Problem-Oriented Policing This course introduces students to the proactive approaches designed to reduce crime and disorder being adopted by police departments today to supplement the traditional reactive strategies of the past. Among other topics, the course will consider the relationships between place, victim and offender, Crime Prevention through Environmental Design, the SARA and CompState methods of crime analysis and response, and the use of GIS systems to plot crime locations. 3
CJ 405 Deviant Behavior in Society Examines deviant behavior as a major phenomenon in modern society. Considers functions and dysfunctions of deviance in society. Gives particular emphasis to the process whereby individuals learn deviant lifestyles and support and justify these lifestyles within social groups. 3
CJ 410 Race, Crime and Poverty This course examines the relationships among minority status, crime and poverty. The effects of family structure, weak formal and informal social controls, restricted opportunities (including education and employment), and substance abuse on crime are examined. The mutual responses of the criminal justice system and minority status to each other are also examined. 3
CJ 425 Children's Rights and Societal Responses Introduces the student to policies and services designed to meet a range of needs and problems experienced by children and their families. Specific areas of analysis include child abuse and neglect, juvenile justice, foster care, adoptions, and institutional vis-a-vis community strategies in response to particular problems and advocacy. 3
CJ 433 The American Prison This course focuses upon the role of the prison in corrections. It reviews the historical development of the prison, major features of inmate culture(s), the structure of staff/prisoner relationships, and its 'success' as a site of reform and resocialization. Special topics may include cross-cultural comparisons, prison violence (including riots), prisoner health care (including AIDS, substance abuse, pregnancy, etc.), and the structure of careers in corrections. 3
CJ 454 Computer Applications in Social Research The structure of data files is described and the commands required to generate descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, cross tabulations, correlations, and several multivariate statistical procedures are reviewed. Prior experience with computers is not required. Prerequisite: CJ/SOC/SSCI 351. 3
CJ 460 Criminal Justice Internship Placement in a federal, state or local criminal justice agency for at least 120 hours. Students must maintain a field diary and complete a paper integrating their course and field work. Prerequisite: at least seven prior courses in criminal justice. 3
CJ 465 Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice Interdisciplinary seminar in the social sciences with special emphasis on the presentations of student research projects in the area of criminal justice. Prerequisite: CJ/SOC/SSCI 454. 3
CJ 470 Special Topics in Criminal Justice Examination of current trends and issues affecting the operation and management of the criminal and juvenile justice system. 3
CJ 499 Independent Study and Research Involves faculty directed, student initiated study and research on a topic relevant to student interest. 3
CJ 503 Criminal Justice Administration Familiarizes students with the internal segments, functions, and mission of the criminal justice system. Emphasis on the internal problems confronted by the administrator. 3
CJ 505 Financial Management Study of financial management tools and budgeting techniques applicable to the public sector. Students deal with cases and other assigned materials focusing on budgeting and financial decision making. 3
CJ 507 Criminal Justice Research Methods

This course introduces students to the research methods employed in criminal justice, including survey methodology, quantitative methods, and data analysis using analytic software. Prerequisite: at least one undergraduate or graduate course in social research and/or social statistics. Previous undergraduate or graduate course-work in criminal justice, sociology, or criminology is recommended, but not required.

3
CJ 522 Criminology

An advanced seminar in Criminology; classical and contemporary theories of crime are examined in original sources.

Prerequisite: Prior undergraduate or graduate coursework in criminology, deviance or delinquency.

3
CJ 524 Sex, Drugs, and Crime

Prostitution and drugs are often associated with criminal violence. This course will explore legal and illegal social worlds of sex workers, drug users, and others to evaluate current explanations for their persistence and interconnections with violent crime -- in the US, abroad, and at different class levels.

3
CJ 526 Race, Ethnicity and Criminal Justice

The over-representation of racial and ethnic minorities in criminal justice processes has been noted for well over 100 years, yet the explanation for it remains unclear. This seminar will explore the extent of these disparities and the possible reasons for them. 

Prerequisite: an undergraduate course in criminology, delinquency, deviance, or intergroup relations is required.

3
CJ 528 Youthful Offenders

This course provides a detailed examination of the social, psychological, and biological factors associated with juvenile delinquency and related risky youth behaviors. Major areas of study include family and community dynamics, peer networks, neurological and genetic risks, and agegraded changes in antisocial involvement.

3
CJ 530 Criminal Justice Policies An advanced seminar that explores the historcal and contemporary policy approaches of criminal justice systems (i.e., policing, courts, and corrections). Major areas of study include the war on drugs, juvenile justice and street gangs, incarceration and prisoner reentry, U.S. border control, and terrorism. 3
CJ 533 Crime over the Life Course

This course traces the development of criminality from birth into old age. Drawing upon longitudinal studies of delinquent and adult offenders in the United States and elsewhere, biological, psychological, and social correlates of criminal onset, persistence and desistance are examined.

3
CJ 540 The Constitution and Criminal Justice Policy Stresses the effect of court decisions and the law on policy making, planning, and administrative discretion in the criminal justice system. 3
CJ 544 Staff Supervision in Criminal Justice

This course examines the role of a staff supervisor in criminal justice settings. It focuses on five functions of an effective supervisor: planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling, and the tools that facilitate them. It reviews also the principles of effective leadership and their application in criminal justice agencies.

3
CJ 560 Urban Crime Patterns

This seminar introduces students to the spatial patterns of crime and their relationship to other features of the urban environment. It examines the classic studies of the Chicago School and the theories of urban crime developed there. Current studies applying and extending these theories will be reviewed. Finally, the seminar will review the use of GIS to document urban crime patterns. Participants will have an opportunity to conduct basic GIS analyses of urban data. Data and examples will be drawn whenever possible from the Scranton, Philadelphia, or New York metropolitan areas.

3
CJ 569 Media and Crime

This course provides an introduction to the relationship between media and crime in modern society. Topics include patterned images of crime in news and entertainment media; economic, political, and cultural factors that influence how media present crime; the relationship between media content and fear of crime; and how crime in the media influences crime policy and the criminal justice system.

3
CJ 576 Corrections

This course places a major emphasis on the historical and social contexts of corrections. It presents the views of victims, reformers, prison officials, and others. The student is taken inside the role behavior of the probation officer, warden, et al., to determine what constitutes an effective and satisfactory job. Dialogue concerning controversial probation issues is encouraged to provoke thought and balance.

3
CJ 578 Community Corrections

The course combines theoretical and practical considerations of the philosophy, goals, problems, treatment approaches, and developing trends in the area of community corrections. Major topics include defining the mission of community corrections, historical development, probation/parole, pretrial services, boot camps, halfway houses, work release programs, electronically-monitored home confinement, drug/alcohol treatment programs, community service, and job training/ placement programs.

3
CJ 595 Thesis

Original research in Criminal Justice executed by the student under the supervision of a thesis director in Criminal Justice and at least one additional faculty member. This opportunity is intended for students who plan to continue their education in a doctoral program in Criminal Justice or a related field. It is normally taken in the last semester of master’s level work.

3
CJ 597 Management Project /Internship Students employed in a criminal justice agency will complete a management project demonstrating their ability to use the knowledge and skills they have acquired in the program to identify, document, and resolve a management problem selected in concert with their agency and Marywood project supervisors. Students who are not so employed will complete a 240 hour internship in a criminal justice agency in which they integrate features of their classroom learning with their experiences as an intern in the field. A major paper is required in either case. This course must be completed, normally within 9 credits of graduation, by all degree candidates, except those completing a Master's Thesis. 3
CJ 598 Special Topics in Criminal Justice This seminar offers an in-depth examination of a topic of interest to the criminal justice community. 3
ECON 100 Basic Economics Presents a one-term survey of modern economics and economic systems, emphasizing major concepts of economics illustrated by the examination of current economic problems and policies. 3
ECON 101 Principles of Economics I Introduces principles of economic theory as applied to the aggregate economy (macroeconomics); compares the United States economy to other economic systems; evaluates the performance of the United States economy and of institutions within that economy; applies fiscal policy and monetary policy to resolve current economic problems; analyzes trade and finance among nations; analyzes externalities such as pollution. 3
ECON 102 Principles of Economics II Offers theoretical and empirical evaluation of market power with respect to prices, production, and employment in specific industries (microeconomics); examines the distribution of income and pricing of economic resources; explores the evolutionary forms for economics in the future. 3
ECON 300 American Economic History Studies the history of the United States economic development from the colonial period to the present. Cross-listed with HIST 300. 3
ECON 499 Independent Study and Research Involves faculty directed, student initiated study and research on a topic relevant to student interest. 3
GEOG 210 Principles of Geography Presents study and unification of a number of earth sciences that give general insight into the nature of the environment. Focuses on concepts of geographic thought, tools of geography, map structure, population patterns, space relationships, and modern problems of geography. 3
HIST 100 Roots of the Modern World Studies the pivotal events and achievements of humankind, stressing the period from the Enlightenment to World War I and relating them to life in contemporary times. 3
HIST 101 Global History of the Twentieth Century Analyzes major events and influences in this century, interpreting the decline of European hegemony, the rise of new world powers, and the emergence of the developing world. (global) 3
HIST 105 Ethnicity and Diversity in the Modern World Socio-historical analysis of racial, ethnic, and other (gender, age, sexual orientation) diverse groups, with special emphasis on American ethnic group members and their origins. (global) 3
HIST 110 Global Resources and Scarcities Presents historical and ecological perspectives on humankind's common heritage of resources and the use of them. Analyzes contrasting interpretations of past and present experiences and competing solutions for the future. (global) 3
HIST 114 History of Industrialism The study of the relationship between private enterprise and the public interest focusing on (a) the historical development, globally, of industrial society; (b) the legal and constitutional development of government as regulator and supporter of business, and (c) case studies in some failures of big business to fulfill its social responsibilities to serve the public interest. (global) 3
HIST 120 Perspectives on the Pursuit of Peace Presents interdisciplinary analysis of the historical, sociological, and philosophical perspectives on the pursuit of peace throughout the centuries. Places emphasis on twentieth century approaches to peace, such as nonviolent resistance, restorative justice, and international cooperation. (global) interdisciplinary 3
HIST 207 Survey of the Developing World Analyzes history of relations between developed and developing world countries, presenting characteristics and causes of underdevelopment. Discusses various solutions to international poverty and underdevelopment. Examines the impact of power politics, ideology, and industrial and financial interests. (global) 3
HIST 220 Hunger in the Twenty-first Century Analyzes the history of efforts to maintain food supply and to overcome the threat of famine and malnutrition, especially in the twentieth century. (global) 3
HIST 230 Women in the Developing World Examines the historical position of women in the developing world and their roles in their nations today. Special attention given to their economic activities in agriculture, marketing, and manufacturing and to their changing social and political roles. Approaches will be explored for enhancing women in development and the development of women. (global) 3
HIST 250 Women in the East and West Students will compare and contrast the experiences of women in China and Japan with those of women in western Europe in the eighteenth through twentieth centuries. The historical and cultural influences upon women's lives will be explored. (global) 3
HIST 252 United States History To 1865 Studies major events in the growth and development of the United States of America, from the colonial period to the Civil War. 3
HIST 253 United States History Since 1865 Studies major events in the growth and development of the United States, from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. 3
HIST 300 American Economic History Studies the history of the United States economic development from the colonial period to the present. Cross-listed with ECON 300. 3
HIST 310 Pennsylvania History and Government Explores the history and government of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania from the founding of the colony by Penn to present day. Includes economic, political, social, and cultural developments that have shaped its history and affected American history. 3
HIST 313 Urban History Building on case studies from the time of the Renaissance to the present, the course examines the links between industrialization, urbanization, and urban planning from a comparative perspective. crosslisted with ARCH 313 3
HIST 314 American Political Thought This course examines five key turning points in American history and considers the competing perspectives on the role of government in American society. Also studied is a comparative perspective that places American thought in the context of the Western political tradition. 3
HIST 320 J Crime and Punishment: A Historical and Comparative Study A comparative study of crime and punishment in a historical context. Focus is on the nature of crime, causes of crime, traditions, and policies designed to punish offenders. (global) 3
HIST 320 H The American Presidency

Examines the nature of presidential power; considers the historical development of the office in the context of the relation of presidential elections to the process of governing. Current issues will be considered from the vantage point of the resources available to the presidency for leadership.

3
HIST 320A American Foreign Policy Since 1945 Studies the development of America's foreign policy from the ending of World War II to the present, with consideration of U.S. Cold War policy, Korea, Vietnam, nuclear development, ending of Communism as a world threat, and the emergence of post Cold War diplomacy for the twenty-first century. (global) 3
HIST 320B Womanhood in America A comprehensive study of the history of women in the United States from the Colonial period to the present. Explores the development of the concept of gender in American society and its influence and importance. Studies the emergence of women's rights groups and the reactions of Americans to the feminist crusaders, and evaluates the achievements of the women's movement to the present. 3
HIST 320C Native Americans in Literature and History Taught in conjunction with the English Department, using an interdisciplinary approach, this course focuses on the history and culture of Native Americans and their relationship over time with the United States government and other Americans. It includes readings from Native Americans of the past and contemporary writers and authors, and discussion of Native American thought and culture as expressed through this literature. 3
HIST 320D Modern America Since 1945 Studies the economic, political, social, and cultural development of the United States from 1945 to the present and focuses on the growing importance of the post World War II nation as a global power, industrially and militarily, and internal developments relative to minorities, reforms, social/cultural issues, and politics. 3
HIST 320E African Americans in History and Literature This course will treat the experiences of African American people in the United States as they are revealed in historical documents and literary works. It may be taken to fulfill either English or History requirements. 3
HIST 320F Post-Modern America in History and Literature A study of post-modern America (1963-1989) that explores American identity in the late twentieth century through history and literature. An interdisciplinary course that may be taken for either History or English credit (ENGL 355). 3
HIST 320G American Sport History: A Social and Cultural History of the United States American Sport History explores the importance of sport in the unfolding history of this nation from the colonial period to the present. It will examine the development of athletic activities and analyze the relationship between sports and social institutions, political and economic structures, geography, and group and individual behavior. 3
HIST 320I Social and Cultural History of the United States Focuses on the social and intellectual history of the United States with emphasis on the special qualities of American culture. Explores such areas as: religion, art, literature, music, economics, and politics. 3
HIST 350 Ancient and Medieval World History General survey of the civilizations of the ancient and medieval worlds, emphasizing their unique contributions to humankind. Required of secondary education majors seeking social science certification. 3
HIST 400 Diplomatic History of the 20th Century Studies terms, theories, issues, events, and policies that are inherent in the international relations between and amongst nations. (global) 3
HIST 420A Europe in the Twentieth Century Studies the major forces at work in the development of Europe in the current century and the events resulting from those forces. Proceeds from the emergence of modern Europe in 1871 to the present. 3
HIST 420B History of Modern Russia Studies the main lines of development of Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent Republics since the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. Examines both continuity and change from Tsarist Russia to the present system. Gives attention to political change and to the transformations that have occurred in the economy, religion, literature, and other arts particularly since the Gorbachev revolution. 3
HIST 420C From Empire to Commonwealth An examination of the imperial history of Great Britain from the seventeenth to the twentieth century, and the development of the Commonwealth relationship of independent nations during the twentieth century. (global) 3
HIST 420D History of Eastern Europe This course focuses on the political, social, economic and cultural developments that have shaped the history of Eastern Europe from the Enlightenment to the present. Special attention will be given to the history of the Habsburg Empire and that of the independent states which emerged in the region after 1918. 3
HIST 420E Totalitarian Regimes in Europe, 1917-1945 This course covers the rise of totalitarian regimes in Germany, the Soviet Union, Italy and Spain, with special emphasis on the causes that led to the rise of Fascism, Nazism and Communism. 3
HIST 420F Democracy and Dictatorship: Europe 1945-1989 The course covers the history of Europe's division in two antithetical political systems and the political, economic, and cultural interactions between them during the Cold War. 3
HIST 440 Modern History of Latin America This course will analyze the historical, political, social, and economic roots of twentieth and twenty-first century Latin America. Attention will focus on the opportunities and challenges facing the region as a whole as well as the circumstances of selected leading nations of the region. (global) 3
HIST 443 Contemporary History of Africa Presents a general survey of the history of Africa from the nineteenth century to the present, emphasizing the development of social, economic, and political institutions of African nations. (global) 3
HIST 454 Contemporary History of the Middle East Focuses on the social, economic, and political development of the Middle East from the nineteenth century to the present. Studies modern states of the Middle East. Discusses the effects of tradition and of Westernization on the social and political structures of the region. (global) 3
HIST 460 A,B Seminars in History These are the capstone courses in the History Program. They are designed to integrate the objectives of the History Program in a course of study that is global in focus and combines work in the Western world and in the developing world. These seminars are required of all History majors at the junior and senior levels of their course of study. They are also open to history majors and others who have completed basic history courses at the 100, 200, and 300-400 levels, subject to the approval of the Chairperson of the Department of Social Sciences. 6
HIST 499 Independent Study and Research Involves faculty directed, student initiated study and research on a topic relevant to student interest. 3
PH 180 Introduction to Public History Examines the origins and objectives of public history as a philosophy of history, providing an overview to the historian's work in museums, historical societies, archives, historic preservation, the federal government, and other organizations in the public sphere. 3
PH 281 Techniques in Public History: Archival and Museum Studies Introduces students to public history techniques. Instructor will focus on archival and museum studies, historical preservation, and exhibit design. 3
PH 382 Techniques in Public History: Basic Principles Examines basic principles of public history with focus on public memory, commemoration, and material culture. 3
PH 383 Digital Techniques in Public History Examines leading digital history works of scholarship, explores theories of narrative in hypertext, and develops models of digital scholarship. Students will be expected to conduct research around selected topics in history, and focus their work on the creation of a digital project, incorporating documentary film and oral history. 3
PH 484 Historical Writing Seminar Seminar in the writing of history: editing and publishing; grant writing; public history proposal; preparation of written materials for lay readers and audiences outside the discipline; and other necessary writing techniques for historians. 3
PH 485 Field Experience in Public History Provides students with a variety of hands-on experiences in Public History at local museums, libraries, and other historical agencies. Activities will involve 100 hours of experience in four professional locations. 3
PL 200 Introduction to Law Provides an overview of the basic areas of law and mechanics of legal research. The case study method is used. 3
PL 210 Legal Reasoning Focus is on the analytical methods courts use to solve legal problems. The interaction of these methods and legal research is demonstrated. Prerequisite: PL 200. 3
PS 210 American Government and Politics Deals with the constitutional basis of the American system, the structure and function of this system, and the role of the people and political parties in its operation. 3
PS 211 State and Local Government Examines the interrelationship between the state government and its political subdivisions, thoroughly analyzing the function, structure, and the operation of each. Special focus on the history and government of Pennsylvania. 3
PS 312 International Relations Studies terms, theories, issues, events, and policies that are inherent in the international relations between and amongst nations. Prerequisite: PS 210. 3
PS 314 American Political Thought The course examines key turning points in American history and considers the competing perspectives on the role of government in American society. Also, a comparative perspective is studied that places American thought in the context of the Western political tradition. Prerequisite: PS 210. 3
PS 315 Constitutional Law I As the first of a two-semester sequence in United States Constitutional Law, deals with Supreme Court decisions on separation of powers, federalism, and powers of Congress and the president. Gives particular emphasis to the court's interpretation of the contract clause, state and federal exercise of the commerce power and other provisions of the main body of the Constitution. Prerequisite: PS 210. 3
PS 316 Constitutional Law II As the second part of a two-semester sequence on United States Constitutional Law, deals with the Supreme Court's interpretation of the substantive rights of the First Amendment to the Constitution: speech, press, petition, assembly, and religion. Also emphasizes the rights of persons accused of crime, as outlined in the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments. Deals with minority rights, as protected under the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments. Prerequisite: PS 210. 3
PS 319 Criminal Law and Procedure Introduces the criminal justice system and the study of law and procedures dealing with criminal offenses. Prerequisite: PS 210. 3
PS 321 Voting, Elections, and Political Parties Considers determinants of individual voting behavior as well as historical and contemporary partisan preferences of the electorate and their impact on public policy making. Prerequisite: PS 210. 3
PS 325 The American Presidency Examines the nature of presidential power; considers the historical development of the office in the context of the relation of presidential elections to the process of governing. Current issues will be considered from the vantage point of the resources available to the presidency for leadership. Prerequisite: PS 210. 3
PS 327 The United States and Contemporary Geopolitics This course focuses on competing views of the U.S. role in the contemporary world and its affairs. Prerequisite: PS 210. 3
PS 350 International Security Studies This course is an in-depth study of the global security environment, with particular attention given to theories seeking to explain occurrences of interstate conflict. Consideration will be given to such factors as global and regional military balances, strategic and conventional weapons, proliferation, resource scarcity, and the problem of terrorism. 3
PS 351 Ethics and Issues of Global Politics This course will address some of the challenging issues that the global community faces as it seeks to adjust to the emerging international reality of the twenty-first century. It will examine, from the perspective of a morally informed debate and dialogue, the choices that confront the international community as it struggles to deal with such issues as: religion and identity, international migration and refugees, humanitarian intervention, human rights and the use of force. Case studies will be used to illuminate and apply moral norms to these and other issues and problems in international relations. 3
PS 400 Comparative Government This course studies selected countries in Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia, and Latin America and their patterns of political organization and behavior with particular attention to governmental institutions, political parties, elections, and political participation, as well as the influence of social and cultural factors on their respective governments. 3
PS 425 Seminar in American Government This capstone course will bring together contemporary topics as they relate to the health of the American republic, including presidential powers, civil liberties, and the state of the political culture. Prerequisites: PS 210, PS 314, PS 327. 3
PS 499 Independent Study and Research Involves faculty directed, student initiated study, and research on a topic relevant to student interest. The two course Pre-Law sequence is designed to acquaint students with law school's Socratic method. The study of law is presented as a practical application of the skills developed by a liberal arts curriculum. 3
SOC 211 Introductory Sociology Introduces fundamental sociological concepts and interpretations of human behavior. Explores the social dimensions of culture, social structure, and the relationship of human personality to society. Includes the topics of childhood socialization, sex roles, deviance, social classes, social institutions, and social change. 3
SOC 214 Social Problems Considers the causes, consequences, and "social construction" of various social problems in the U.S.: inequalities of race, class, gender, crime in the streets and suites; drug use and sexual deviance; and global issues of environmental destruction and political/religious terrorism. 3
SOC 218 Anthropology Introduces the discipline of anthropology and its subfields. Gives major attention to human evolution and the social and cultural characteristics of non-industrial societies. Emphasizes the diversity of human sociocultural responses to a shared experience. 3
SOC 219 Drugs in American Society Considers the causes and consequences of recreational use and misuse of psychoactive substances: narcotics, alcohol, psychedelics, and "club drugs." Analyzes current legal/correctional and treatment approaches to America's problem with drugs in comparative, historical, and cross-cultural perspectives. 3
SOC 303 Criminology Focuses on crime and delinquency as a major social problem in the United States. Evaluates theories of crime and delinquency in terms of current evidence for their support. 3
SOC 315 Studies in Urbanization Examines the worldwide process of urbanization and critically analyzes its impact on human beings and their institutions. 3
SOC 318 The Tradition of Sociological Ideas Examines the ideas that have been important in the development of sociology as a modern science. Through readings from both primary and secondary sources, provides insight into the creation of social theory. 3
SOC 350 Medical Sociology Examines American health care institutions. Studies social definitions of disease and health, the nature of patient and caregiver roles, and the organization of health care delivery systems. May include the topics of access to primary care among the poor and physician responses to incurable disease. 3
SOC 351 Social Research Focuses on principles of methodology and techniques of research; the relationship between theory and research design; concept formation, measurement, data collection, and data analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 216. 3
SOC 400 Aging and Society The study of aging in American society. Considers the biology of aging, the psychology of aging, sexuality and aging, friendship and family relationships, changes in status and power. Particular attention is given to the development and management of long term care centers. 3
SOC 402 Dying and Death in American Society Introduces thanatology, the study of dying and death, from a psychological and sociological perspective. Considers American attitudes toward death with particular emphasis on the development of the hospice movement as an aspect of the health care system in America. 3
SOC 405 Deviant Behavior in Society Examines deviant behavior as a major phenomenon in modern society. Considers functions and dysfunctions of deviance in society. Gives particular emphasis to the process whereby individuals learn deviant lifestyles and support and justify these lifestyles within social groups. 3
SOC 410 Race, Crime and Poverty This course examines the relationships among minority status, crime and poverty. The effects of family structure, weak formal and informal social controls, restricted opportunities (including education and employment), and substance abuse on crime are examined. The mutual responses of the criminal justice system and minority status to each other are also examined. 3
SOC 411 The Family Examines the family as a social institution -- its composition, organization, duration and functions in contemporary America. Involves cross-cultural and multigenerational analyses. 3
SOC 413 Ethnic Pride and Protest Analyzes the social organization of a multiracial and ethnically diverse society, the cultural and political problems in racial and ethnic relations, and the internal organization of minority communities in different settings. 3
SOC 419 Studies in Class, Status, and Power Examines the distribution of wealth, power, and prestige in human societies and the impact of that distribution on individual lives and social processes. Pays special attention to social class in America, including the problems of underprivileged Americans. 3
SOC 425 Religion in Social Context Explores the social dimensions of religious belief, religious group structures, and the social characteristics of communities of coreligionists. Draws upon nineteenth and twentieth century sociological theories of religiosity, secularization, and religious change to understand religion in contemporary industrial societies, especially that of the United States. 3
SOC 452 Computer Applications in Social Research The structure of data files is described and the commands required to generate descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, cross tabulations, correlations, and several multivariate statistical procedures are reviewed. Prior experience with computers is not required. 3
SOC 460 Internship in Applied Sociology Involves the student in a field experience in a community, organizational, or industrial setting. Through this experiential setting, gives opportunity to integrate and apply classroom based materials. 3
SOC 499 Independent Study and Research Involves faculty directed, student initiated study and research on a topic relevant to student interest. 3
SSCI 201 Introduction to Social Sciences Designed to give students basic information in several social science disciplines. Introduces the perspective and methodology of the social sciences. Focuses on changes taking place in contemporary society. (interdisciplinary) 3
SSCI 351 Social Research Focuses on principles of methodology and techniques of research, the relationship between theory and research design, concept formation, measurement, data collection, and data analysis. 3
SSCI 411 Curriculum and Methods in Secondary Social Studies Introduces contemporary theories and approaches to teaching of social studies at the secondary level. 3
SSCI 425 Children's Rights and Societal Responses Analyzes policies and services designed to meet a range of needs and problems experienced by children and their families. Specific areas of analysis include child abuse and neglect; juvenile justice; homelessness; foster care; adoptions; institutional vis-a-vis community strategies in response to particular problems; impacts of prejudice/ discrimination on minority groups, children, and families; advocacy, and social change. 3
SSCI 430 Aging: Issues and Perspectives Examines the biological, psychological, social, and cultural dimensions of aging. Analyzes roles and relationships of older persons and systems that make up their environment (e.g., family, friends, neighborhood, etc.). The contemporary continuum of care in the context of a strengths-based approach is explored. The course also focuses on ageism, stereotyping, advocacy, and social policy change. Also listed as HSA 430 and SW 430. 3
SSCI 454 Computer Applications in Social Research The structure of data files is described and the commands required to generate descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, cross tabulations, correlations, and several multivariate statistical procedures are reviewed. Prerequisite: SSCI 351. 3
SSCI 465 Coordinating Seminar in Social Sciences Interdisciplinary seminar in the social sciences with special emphasis on the presentations of student research projects. Prerequisite: SSCI 454. 3
SSCI 499 Independent Study and Research Involves faculty directed, student initiated study and research on a topic relevant to student interest. 3