Courses

Science, Mathematics, and Computer Science Courses

Code Course Name Description Credits
ASTR 250 The Solar System

Introduction to the current state and past evolution of the Sun and its family of planets, moons, asteriods, and comets. Critical focus is on developing an understanding of the Earth as a planetary body and learning how the studies of other planets and satellites influence models of the climatic, geologic, and biologic history of our home world. Other topics include energy production in stars, global warming, impact hazards, and the search for life beyond our solar system. Results from past and current NASA missions will be explored.

Prerequisites: MATH 160, PHYS 112.

3
ASTR 260 Galaxies, Relativity, and Cosmology

Introduction to the study of the structure and history of the universe. Topics include the basic properties of energy and gravity, thermonuclear fusion in stars, composition and distribution of galaxies, spacetime, Einstein’s special and general relativity, cosmic microwave background, expansion of the universe, dark energy, and the theories of the big bang and inflation.

3
BIOL 105 DNA Forensics

Provides an understanding of the rapidly evolving field of forensics, particularly the use of DNA sequence detection and analysis. Learn about methodologies that identify criminals based on single cell evidence, or in some cases, exonerate those wrongly accused. Three hours lecture. 

Criminal Justice majors and non-science majors. Normally offered spring semester only. Cross-listed with CJ 105.

3
BIOL 107 Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Discussions on STDs, such as AIDS, chlamydia, genital warts, herpes, emphasizing etiologies, transmission, diagnosis, prophylaxis, and treatment. Includes background information on broad categories of microorganisms, host-parasite relationships, immune defense mechanisms and current therapies. Three hours lecture. 

Family and Consumer Science majors and non-science majors.

3
BIOL 110, 110L Principles of Biology

Surveys life at all levels of organization, ranging from the unicellular to the multicellular forms. Discussions on biological chemistry, reproductive processes, and classification are also included. In laboratory, a hands-on experience wherein students survey life at all levels of organization including biological chemistry, reproductive processes, and organism classification. 

Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Normally offered fall semester only. Education and non-science majors.

4
BIOL 114, 114L Microbiology for the Health Professional

Characterizes features of the broad categories of microorganisms; physical and chemical methods/processes of control; host parasite relationships; airborne, food-water borne, contact-arthropod borne diseases; human defense mechanisms; useful activities of microorganisms.

 Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Nursing majors, Athletic Training, and Exercise Science majors.

4
BIOL 121, 121L Anatomy and Physiology I

Human structure and function are discussed with emphasis on levels of structural organization and body systems, anatomical terminology, homeostasis, cells transport, and tissues. Others are the integumentary, digestive, urinary, endocrine, muscular, and skeletal systems. Three hours lecture, two hours lab.

Nursing, Nutrition/Dietetics, Science Education, and Physical Education majors. Normally offered fall semester only.

4
BIOL 122, 122L Anatomy and Physiology II

This course is designed to provide the basic knowledge of how the organ systems of the body function to preserve an optimal internal environment. The anatomy and physiological phenomena of the respiratory, lymphatic, cardiovascular, reproductive, lymphatic, genito-urinary system, nutrition, metabolism, digestion, and the central nervous systems will be discussed. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. 

Nursing, Nutrition/Dietetics, Science Education, Athletic Training, and Physical Education majors. Normally offered spring semester only. Prerequisites: BIOL 121, 121L.

4
BIOL 130 Principles of Anatomy and Physiology

This course is designed to discuss the basic concepts in anatomy and physiology and develop an understanding of the interrelationships between the different organs and systems. Emphasis is on the anatomy and physiological phenomena of the levels of structural organization and body systems, lymphatic, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, integumentary, and the central nervous system.

 Three hours lecture. Non-science majors and CSD majors.

3
BIOL 150, 150L, 151, 151L General Biology I, II

This course is designed to introduce students to foundational concepts in biology, including: biological constituents, cellular organization, protein synthesis, mitosis, and meiosis. The second part of this course studies the basic structure and function of representative animals. Causes and nature of biological diversity and ecological principles are discussed. 

Three hours lecture, three hours lab. BIOL 150/150L normally offered fall semester only and BIOL 151/151L normally offered spring semester only. BIOL 150, 150L are prerequisites for BIOL 151, 151L. Restricted: Science majors only.

4, 4
BIOL 201, 201L Human Gross Anatomy

This course will discuss the gross anatomy of the human body from a regional point of view, using basic structure-function concept and clinical applications as the basis for anatomical understanding. The physiology, embryology, and histology will also be emphasized especially when they provide anatomical understanding. 

Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Normally offered fall semester only. Science majors.

4
BIOL 202, 202L Human Physiology

This course will provide students with an understanding of the function and regulation of the human body and physiological integration of the organ systems to maintain homeostasis. The course will cover all major aspects of the physiology of the human body including cellular structure and function, and the integration, organization, and control of the organism’s body systems. 

Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Normally offered spring semester only. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, 201L. Science majors.

4
BIOL 234 Introduction to Molecular & Cellular Biology and Nutrigenomics

An introduction to molecular and cellular biology with an emphasis on gene expression as it relates to nutrition. 3 hours lecture. Normally offered spring semester only. 

Restricted: Nutrition and Dietetic majors.

3
BIOL 235, 235L General Microbiology

The broad categories of microorganisms and microscopic systems are covered: morphology, cultivation, reproductive features, microbial genetics, biochemical traits, and taxonomy. Also an introduction to environmental, industrial and medical microbiology provided. 

Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Normally offered fall semester only. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, 150L; BIOL 151, 151L. Science majors.

4
BIOL 281 Introduction to Biotechnology.

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of biotechnology and to the application of biotechnology methodologies and applications in various fields. We will consider specific topics related to agricultural biotechnology, bioremediation, genomics, and others. Considerable emphasis is placed on critical evaluation of biotechnology, e.g. ethical considerations, inherent caveats and opportunities for improvements in the field. 

Normally offered fall semester only. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, 150L, 151, 151L. Science majors.

3
BIOL 302/502 (Bi-level course) Bioinformatics

This course will train students in computer technology to understand and interpret biological and biochemical data. We will focus on database and sequence comparisons, genomics and proteomics analysis, computer simulation and modeling, utilization of software and hardware, and laboratory data collection and analysis. 

Junior and senior science majors and M.S. Biotechnology graduate students. Normally offered spring semester only.

3
BIOL 305 Fundamentals of Neuroscience

Outlines basic concepts in neuroscience including: neurons, glial cells, the action potential and mechanisms of neurotransmitter action. Neuroanatomy will be examined and specific functions of brain regions will be explored in terms of learning and memory, language, behavioral neuroendocrinology, and neurological and psychiatric disorders. 

Junior and senior science and psychology majors. Normally offered spring semester only.

3
BIOL 332, 332L/532, 532L (Bi-level course) Immunology

Studies immune responses in the human body and describes the current diagnostic and analytical techniques. The course focuses at the cellular and molecular levels of the immune response, which includes topics on B-cell development/activation and T-cell development/activation.

Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Normally offered spring semester only. Prerequisites: BIOL 235, 235L; CHEM 132, 132L. Junior and senior science majors and M.S. Biotechnology graduate students.

4
BIOL 351 Evolution


alternate years

Investigates the origin of life, geological time, the fossil record, and evolutionary mechanisms. 

Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, 150L; BIOL 151, 151L. Science majors,

3
BIOL 383/583 (Bi-level course) Emerging Medicines and Technologies

This course will focus on new scientific discoveries that affect, or promise to affect, mankind. The emerging medicines covered in this course include gene therapy, antiobesity and anti-aging drugs, mental illness treatments, genetic testing, and cancer research topics. An understanding of the biological basis of each emerging medicine will be focal. 

Normally offered spring semester only. Junior and senior science majors and M.S. Biotechnology graduate students. Prerequisites: BIOL 235, 235L, CHEM 222, 222L.

3
BIOL 401/501 (Bi-level course) Cell Culture

This course is designed to provide students with fundamental skills in cell and tissue culture. The techniques include media preparation, sterile technique, primary culture establishment, cell growth and maintenance, transfection, cloning of cultured cells. Junior and senior science majors and M.S. Biotechnology graduate students. 

Three hour lecture with lab. Normally offered fall semester only. Prerequisites: BIOL 235, 235L, CHEM 132, 132L.

3
BIOL 410 Science Literacy Capstone

Group discussions on current scientific topics with an emphasis on utilizing the Internet as a source of information. Preparing a professional resume, conducting a job search, tips on interviewing, and applying to graduate or professional schools are covered. Typical expectations involve an oral presentation and the submission of a scientific paper. 

Junior and senior science majors. Normally offered fall semester only.

2
BIOL 411B Curriculum Methods and Materials

Topics included are theoretically based methods and materials for science education in a classroom and laboratory setting. Addresses strengths, practical concerns, and apprehensions of prospective science educators. Computer software applications to education. 

Prerequisite: EDUC 411A. Science Education majors. Permission of the Department Chairperson required.

4
BIOL 421, 421L/521 (Bi-level course), 521L, 422/522 (Bi-level course) Biochemistry I, II

Examines the biochemical building blocks of the cell, emphasizing structure, basic reactions and how they are catalyzed by enzymes, along with an overview of how cell structure is dictated by the chemistry. The course goes on to examine the pathways of general metabolism. In addition, DNA and RNA will be examined from a regulatory standpoint, as well as the way in which pollutant and drug metabolism can alter the mutation rate, increasing the risk of cancer. The lab component includes basic biochemical concepts with an emphasis placed on experimental design, equipment theory, proper technique, and how to approach daunting research problems.

BIOL 421, 421L/521, 521L normally offered fall semester only. Three hours lecture, four hours lab;. Junior and senior science majors and M.S. Biotechnology graduate students. BIOL 422/522 normally offered spring semester only. Prerequisites: BIOL 235, 235L, CHEM 222, 222L with 421, 421L/521, 521L as prerequisites for BIOL 422/522.

4,3
BIOL 440, 440L/550, 550L (Bi-level course) Molecular and Cellular Biology

Provides a working understanding of eukaryotic gene expression and control at the transcriptional and translational levels; cellular communication and signaling; and cellular growth, division, development and formation of cancers. Emphasis will be on recent advances in the fields of molecular biology and biotechnology. Threehour lecture, three-hour lab. Lab is designed to provide experience in DNA and RNA manipulation, PCR, gene cloning. 

Normally offered spring semester only. Prerequisites: BIOL 235, 235L, CHEM 222, 222L. Junior and senior science majors and M.S. Biotechnology students.

4
BIOL 446, 446L/546 (Bi-level course), 546L Genetics

Presents an introduction to Mendelian inheritance, recombinant DNA technology, and genomics. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory. 

Normally offered fall semester only. Prerequisites: BIOL 235, 235L, CHEM 132, 132L. Junior and senior science majors and M.S. Biotechnology students only.

4
BIOL 454 Undergraduate Research

Requires laboratory or library research on an assigned problem. Hours are arranged by the advisor. 

Prerequisites: QPA minimum 2.50 and approval of the Science Department chair. A public demonstration of the research may be requested. Junior and senior science majors.

2
BIOL 455 Senior Biotechnology Research Project

Provides the student with a hands-on laboratory project, or Internet/bioinformaticsbased project. Can involve elements of biology, chemistry, environmental science, et al. Research paper or presentation required. 

Senior science (Biotechnology) majors only.

2
BIOL 498 Internship

The student works in a commercial laboratory facility gaining experience and expertise in the student’s area of specialization. Credit is earned by providing a report and/ or presentation to the department, following the internship period, e.g. during the following semester.

 Arranged with approval of the Science Department chairperson. Junior and senior science majors.

3
BIOL 499 Independent Study

Arranged only with special permission of department chairperson.

Junior and senior science majors.

1, 2, or 3
BIOL 501 Cell Culture

This course is designed to provide students with fundamental skills in cell and tissue culture. The techniques include media preparation, sterile technique, primary culture establishment, cell growth and maintenance, transfection, and cloning of cultured cells. Three hours lecture and lab.

3
BIOL 502 Bioinformatics

This course will train students in computer technology to understand and interpret biological and biochemical data.We will focus on database and sequence comparisons, genomics and proteomics analysis, computer simulation and modeling, utilization of software and hardware, and laboratory data collection and analysis.

3
BIOL 520 Literature Review

This selected topics course will provide an in-depth review and discussion of important current publications related to modern science and industry. The course will focus on several broad areas of biotechnology. In several instances it will include readings that relate basic advances in modern science to biomedicine and industry. M.S. Biotechnology majors. A public presentation is also required. 

2
BIOL 521, 521L, 522 Biochemistry I and II

Biochemistry concepts, including structure, reactivity of proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates. A brief overview of carbohydrate metabolism, including the ETS and oxidative phosphorylation processes are covered. Lab component involves advanced analytical skills related to lecture topics. BIOL 521+L is three hours lecture, three hours lab. BIOL 522 is three hours lecture. Organic chemistry is a prerequisite.

4,3
BIOL 532, 532L Immunology

Studies immune responses in the human body, as well as current approaches to disease diagnosis and treatment using immunology. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. 

4
BIOL 540+540L Molecular and Cellular Biology

Provides a working understanding of DNA, RNA, proteins associated with eukaryotic (e.g. mammalian) cells. Emphasis on recent advances in molecular biology and biotechnology. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Lab designed to provide experience in DNA and RNA manipulation, PCR, gene cloning.

4
BIOL 595 Research Provides the student with a hands-on laboratory project, or bioinformatics-based project. Can involve elements of biology, chemistry, environmental science, et al. Formal write-up of findings and public presentation required. 1 or 2
CHEM 105 Chemistry for the Artist

Presents fundamental principles of chemistry as well as light and color theory for the artist. Application of principles to ceramics, glass, pigments, metals, modern synthetics, cleansing agents, and other household consumer products. 

Three hours lecture. Art and non-science majors.

3
CHEM 110 Introductory Chemistry


fall

Studies basic chemical concepts and principles, with emphasis on the quantitative aspects of real chemistry.

Three hours lecture. Nutrition and Dietetics or Elementary Education majors. Normally offered fall semester only.

3
CHEM 121, 121L Principles of Chemistry


fall

Studies basic general chemistry, with emphasis on medical and environmental applications. 

Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Normally offered fall semester only. Nursing and non-science majors.

4
CHEM 131, 131L, 132, 132L General Chemistry I, II

The first part of this course covers the topics of naming compounds, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, states of matter, chemical equilibria, and an introduction to acid/ base chemistry. In part II of this course, the topics covered include kinetics, thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, electron configuration, molecular orbital theory, and solubility complexes that build on the theories discussed in CHEM 131 (General Chemistry I). Both courses also have a laboratory component that provides a “hands-on” experience to introduce and develop analytical and lab-based skills that are relevant to lecture material.

Three hours lecture, three hours lab. CHEM 131 normally offered fall semester only and CHEM 132 normally offered spring semester only. Prerequisite for CHEM 131, 131L: a minimum of 1 year high school chemistry; CHEM 131, 131L are prerequisites for CHEM 132, 132L. Science majors.

4,4
CHEM 210 Introductory Organic Chemistry

Studies a brief survey of the classes of carbon compounds — nomenclature, properties, reactions of the functional groups.

Three hours lecture. Normally offered spring semester only. Prerequisite: CHEM 110. Nutrition and Dietetics majors.

3
CHEM 221, 221L, 222, 222L Organic Chemistry I, II

Offers an in-depth study of the properties of the major classes of organic compounds, covering methods of identification, preparation structure, bonding. 

Three hours lecture; three hours lab. Restricted: Science majors only. CHEM 221/221L normally offered fall semester only and CHEM 222/222L normally offered spring semester only. Prerequisites for CHEM 221, 221L are CHEM 132, 132L. Prerequisites for CHEM 222, 222L are CHEM 221, 221L.

4, 4
CHEM 310 Introduction to Biochemistry

Deals with the chemistry of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and enzymes. Also involves the study of carbohydrate metabolism to include glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, and the electron transport system.

Normally offered fall semester only. Nutrition and Dietetics majors.

3
CHEM 312 Environmental Chemistry


alternate years

This course focuses on the chemistry related to several environmental concerns of atmospheric and aquatic pollution. Topics covered in the course include energy and climate changes, toxic organic compounds, pesticides, heavy metals, and chemical properties of hazardous waste. 

Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: CHEM 221, 221L; CHEM 222, 222L. Junior and senior science majors.

3
CHEM 313 Elements of Medicinal Chemistry

This course will examine the basic theory of novel drug design based on interaction of chemicals with biological receptors. Drug targets will be studied as well as basic elements of drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics. Case studies in drug design will be used to illustrate the structure-activity relationships and design aspects for various classes of drugs, such as antibacterial agents, anticancer agents, drugs acting on the central nervous system, and opioid analgesics. 

Restricted: Science majors only. Prerequisite: CHEM 221 and 221 Lab. Normally offered spring semester only.

3
CHEM 398, 398L Chemical Analysis


alternate years

This course introduces analytical instrumental theory and data collection methods designed for students who have an interest in the fields of research, biotechnology, biochemistry, or environmental science. Laboratory experiments introduce various analytical instruments, methodology, and data interpretation. 

Two hours lecture; three hours lab. Prerequisites: CHEM 222, 222L; MATH 155. Junior and senior science majors.

3
CHEM 415 Special Topics: Wine Chemistry, Cuisine, and Culture

This course focuses on the chemistry of wine, spirits, and foods (particularly the cheeses) of a regional foreign country. Additional topics include sensory perception, understanding wine labels, and the history of wine making. Specific foods, beverages, and products from the region will be reviewed and discussed leading up to a 10-day study abroad component to a foreign country. 

Three hours lecture. Science and Nutrition/Dietetics majors.

3
CHEM 499 Independent Study

Arranged only with special permission of department chairperson. 

Open to junior and senior Science majors.

1, 2 or 3
CS 111 Problem-Solving and the Computer

This course will teach students how to use computers as effective tools for solving problems and analyzing data. Students will be introduced to Microsoft Office applications, with primary focus on using Excel to analyze data and solve problems.

3
CS 142 Programming In C++

An introduction to advanced software engineering concepts using C++ and structured programming. Rudiments of the language and program optimization are stressed.

3
CS 150 Object Oriented Programming

An introduction to the theory and practice of object oriented programming. Topics include objects, classes, inheritance, simple data structures, and basic concepts of software development.

Prerequisite: CS 142.

3
CS 241 Machine Language with Assembler

Basic principles of machine language programming. Computer organization and representation of numbers, strings, arrays, list structures, all at the machine level. Includes Assembler language.

Prerequisite: CS 142.

3
CS 242 Computer Architecture

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of computer architecture. Topics include transistors, logic gates, basic processor components, memory, input/output devices, and low-level machine instructions.

Prerequisite: CS 142.

3
CS 245 Computer Data Structures

A study of the use of a high-level language to implement complex data structures. These include lists, trees, graphs, networks, storage allocations, file structure, and information storage and retrieval.

Prerequisite: CS 142.

3
CS 250 Database and Applications

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of relational databases. Topics include data modeling and database design, the relational algebra and relational calculus, data definition and manipulation languages using SQL, query processing and optimization, transaction management, security, privacy, integrity management. 

Prerequisite: CS 142.

3
CS 314 Mathematical Models and Computer Techniques

Mathematical models with an emphasis on constrained optimization problems. Topics include linear programming, network and integer models, and multi-objective optimization.

Prerequisites: CS 142, MATH 212.

3
CS 320 Software Engingeering

This course is an introduction to the software development process and design. Topics covered include concepts and techniques for designing, developing, and modifying large software systems; design patterns and modeling languages; specification and documentation; version control; testing and debugging; project team organization and management. 

Prerequisite: CS 150.

3
CS 322 Computer Networks

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of computer networks, the software protocols that allow them to operate, and the applications that make use of them. Topics covered include direct-link networks, packet switching, internetworking, end-to-end protocols, network applications, and network security.

Prerequisite: CS 242.

3
CS 341 Analysis of Algorithms

Theoretical analysis of various algorithms. Topics to include sorting, searching, selection, matrix multiplication, and multiplication of real numbers.

Prerequisite: CS 245.

3
CS 342 Principles of Compilers

This course introduces students to the essential elements of building a compiler: scanning, parsing, semantic analysis, and code-generation etc. Familiarity with how modern programming languages behave is assumed. Prerequisites: CS 150 and CS 242.

3
CS 344 Operating System Principles

Analysis of the computer operating systems including Batch, Timesharing and Realtime systems. Topics to include sequential and concurrent processes, processor and storage management, resource protection, processor multiplexing, and handling of interrupts from peripheral devices.

Prerequisite: CS 245.

3
CS 350 Computer Graphics

This course studies the principles of computer graphics. Topics include geometric modeling, 3D viewing and projection, lighting and shading, color, and the use of one or more technologies and packages such as OpenGL.

Prerequisites: CS 150, MATH 213.

3
CS 352 Web Applications and Development

This course covers fundamentals of web applications and development, including common web protocols and standards. Topics include HTML, CSS, and development using JSP.

Prerequisite: CS 150.

3
CS 456 Introduction to Programming Languages

This course introduces students to the key features of programming languages. Topics include structuring data, computation, and whole programs, data types, type checking, exception handling, concurrent processes, synchronization, modularity, encapsulation, interfaces, separate compilation, inheritance, polymorphism, dynamic binding, subtyping, overloading etc. 

Prerequisites: CS 342 and CS 344.

3
CS 463 Introduction to Numerical Methods

Deals with solutions to equations, matrix methods, linear systems of equations, matrix inversion, eigenvalue problems, numerical differentiation. 

Prerequisites: CS 142, MATH 213, 322.

3
CS 490 Capstone Project

This course is designed to be the culminating experience for Computer Science and Information Security majors. Students are expected to complete a significant project under the supervision of a faculty member. Knowledge and skills learned in the curriculum are to be applied, documented, and demonstrated in the capstone project.

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CS 498 Special Topics in Computer Science

This course will cover special topics not available in the current CS curriculum when significant interest among students and faculty arises.

ENVS 109 Technology, Environment, and Society

Issues included are: depletion of energy resources, environmental degradation, and biotechnology. The course is designed to give the student an in-depth understanding of selected topics in relationship to ethics, philosophy, economics, and consumerism. 

Normally offered fall semester only. Architecture majors only.

3
ENVS 210 Water: The Essential Ingredient

An introduction to the environmental sciences, emphasizing the value of water as a natural resource. Topics include: scientific measurement, pH, the ecology of natural populations, water use and supply, water pollution, acid rain, the greenhouse effect, water purification, water power, and aqua culture. Involves lecture-demonstration.

3
ENVS 212 Introduction to Meteorology

This course introduces the study of earth’s atmosphere and its associated weather phenomena. Topics include: origin, evolution, structure, and characteristics of earth’s atmosphere; moisture; pressure; storm dynamics; fronts; meteorological equipment; local and global weather patterns; and weather forecasting. Emphasis is placed on visuals, realtime, and compiled weather data, including satellite and radar imagery, computer modeling, and weather map analysis.

Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Science, Aviation, and non-science majors.

3
ENVS 213 Applied Meteorology

This course expands on and utilizes standard introductory meteorology topics and relates them to practical scientific and real world application. The course emphasizes a deeper study of atmospheric measurement, observation, instrumentation, practical weather application, map analysis, data interpretation and weather forecasting. Heavy emphasis is placed on the use of weather data, instruments, tools, local climate data, visuals and a multi-dimensional understanding of atmospheric processes.

3
ENVS 215, 216 Resource Conservation I, II

Designed to provide the student with an awareness of natural resources. Considers resource use in light of its impact on the natural environment. Part I examines fundamental resources such as soil, water, forests, and wildlife. Part II includes controversial topics such as energy, nuclear power, pollution, and the use of pesticides.

Science and non-science majors.

3,3
ENVS 261 Earth Science I -- Geology

Studies the physical earth — minerals, rocks, mountains, valleys, glaciers, volcanoes, and earthquakes. 

Three hours lecture and demonstration. Science and non-science majors.

3
ENVS 262 Earth Science II -- Oceanography, Meteorology

Investigates oceans and weather systems of the earth and their importance to society. Topics include ocean life, ocean resources, marine habitats, marine policy, and exploration. 

Three hours lecture and demonstrations. Science and nonscience majors.

3
ENVS 300+ ENVS Specialty Course

Experts in various fields of ENVS will offer courses in their area of expertise. 

Junior and senior science majors.

3-4
ENVS 340 Environmental Law

Overview of the field of environmental law and the major related statutes. Explores particular categories, issues and concerns that affect society and government. 

Environmental Science and non-science majors.

3
ENVS 345 Environmental Management and Policy

Course topics include an examination of environmental policy and the relationship between local, state, and federal agencies. The responsibilities of industry and the role of society in decision-making regarding environmental issues are addressed. 

Three hours lecture. Environmental Science and non-science majors.

3
ENVS 420, 420L/520, 520L (Bi-level course) Ecology


fall

Investigates the relationship between living organisms and their natural environment. Emphasizes the existence of natural species and their interactions with other life forms. 

Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Junior and senior science majors and M.S. Biotechnology graduate students. Normally offered fall semester only.

4
ENVS 454 Undergraduate Research

Requires laboratory or library research on an assigned problem. Hours are arranged by the advisor. 

Prerequisites: QPA minimum 2.50 and approval of the chair of the Science Department. A public demonstration of the research may be requested. Junior and senior science majors.

2
ENVS 498 Internship

The student works in an actual commercial laboratory facility gaining experience and expertise in the student’s area of specialization. Arranged with approval of the Science Department chairperson. 

Junior and senior science majors.

3
ENVS 499 Independent Study

Arranged only with special permission of department chairperson. 

Junior and senior science majors.

1, 2 or 3
ENVS 520, 520L Ecology

Investigates the relationship between living organisms and their natural environment. Emphasizes the existence of natural species and their interactions with other life forms. Three hours lecture, two hours lab.

4
ENVS 625 Environmental Management and Policy

Course topics include an examination of environmental policy and the relationship between local, state, and federal agencies. The responsibilities of industry and the role of society in decision-making regarding environmental issues are addressed.

3
INSC 410/510 Legal Issues in Information Security

This course is an introduction to the legal and regulatory issues in the field of information security. Federal laws and regulations, including OMB and NIST standards, are examined. Moral and ethical issues for professionals in the field are also considered.

3
INSC 420/520 Introduction to Computer Security

This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles and common practices of computer and information security. It provides an overview of such topics as cryptography, network intrusion and detection, software and operating system security, VPN etc.

Prerequisites: CS 242, CS 322.

3
INSC 430/530 Network Security

The course is an introduction to the field of network security. The course covers network security services such as authentication and access control, integrity and confidentiality of data, firewalls and related technologies, Web security and privacy. 

Prerequisite: CS 322.

3
INSC 440/540 Introduction to Cryptography

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice in the field of cryptography. Topics include classic and modern ciphers (DES, AES, RSA etc.), digital signature, message digest, key exchange protocols, and PKI. 

Prerequisite: CS 150, MATH 323.

3
INSC 445/545 Security Policies and Implementations

This course provides an overview of the best practices of developing and implementing effective organizational policies and programs on information security. Topics include privacy, contingency response, infrastructure reliability, risk assessment and management, and organizational roles and responsibilities.

3
INSC 450/550 Digital Forensics

This course introduces students to the field of digital forensics and it will focus on the contemporary policy issues and applied technologies. Topics to be covered include: legal and regulatory issues, investigation techniques, data analysis approaches, and incident response procedures for Windows and UNIX systems. 

Prerequisite: CS 242, CS 245.

3
INSC 560 Applied Cryptography and Secure Communication

This course studies real world cryptographic systems and examines their strength and weaknesses. Some commonly deployed cryptosystems will be used as examples in this course. 

Prerequisite: INSC 440/540

3
INSC 565 Operating Systems Security

This course covers the fundamental theory and practice in Operating System security. OS level security architectures and mechanisms will be studied. Topics include OS level security architectures and mechanism, OS security policies, and basic OS security techniques. 

Prerequisite: CS 344 at Marywood or equivalent.

3
INSC 590 Special Topics in Information Security

Special topics that are not available in other courses may be covered when there is enough interest among students and faculty.

3
INSC 620 Cloud Computing Security

This course investigates the security issues related to cloud computing, such as confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data and computations. Practical applications of secure cloud computing will be explored, current research publications will be the focus of this course.

Prerequisite: INSC 420/520.

3
INSC 630 Data Protection and Recovery

In this course, students will study computer file storage systems, with the focus on data protection and recovery. Topics include data backups, diversification, RAID systems, disaster response and recovery etc. 

Prerequisite: INSC 420/520.

3
INSC 640 Mobile System Security

This course will investigate security issues in mobile systems. When devices such as smart phones and tablets are carrying more and more personal as well as business data, security threats from mobile systems must be dealt with by developing consistent security policies and implementing effective security programs across all platforms. Both policy and technical considerations will be covered in this course.

Prerequisite: INSC 420/520.

3
INSC 650 Corporate Information Security

This course examines information security in the corporate environment. Common sources of security threats are identified and addressed. Technological, human behavioral, and policy solutions are considered. Further topics include incident response, legal issues, and public relations.

Prerequisite: INSC 410/510.

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MATH 095 Fundamentals of Mathematics

Topics include exponents, radicals, factoring, linear and quadratic equations, graphing or linear and polynomial functions, area, volume, systems of equation, and problem-solving. Three credit course. Credits do not fulfill core Mathematics requirement or apply to credits toward graduation. Prerequisite to most core Mathematics courses for students who do not have minimum 530 MATH SAT (500 pre-March 2016) or pass algebra placement exam.

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MATH 120 Mathematics in the Liberal Arts

Designed to implement NCTM curriculum standards with emphasis on problem-solving, patterns and relationships, functions, estimation, and mathematical connections to other disciplines. Topics are chosen from this list: functions, astronomy, number theory in music and cryptology, probability, statistics up to the normal distribution, graph theory, voting methods and logic. No prior knowledge of any of these topics is assumed.

3
MATH 130 Mathematics for Contemporary Society

This course is designed to prepare education majors to successfully pass the math portion of the PRAXIS. Topics studied include linear functions and models, systems of linear equations and linear programming, compound interest, set theory and its applications, probability and statistics. 

Prerequisite: Minimum 530 MATH SAT (500 pre-March 2016), MATH 095, or passing the math placement exam for algebra. Restricted to Education majors only.

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MATH 150 Architectural Mathematics

The principles of mathematics relating to architecture and building design. Topics studied include inequalities, graphing, polynomials, the fundamental theorem of algebra, rational functions, trigonometric functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, conic sections, polar equations, and parametric equations. 

Prerequisite: Minimum 530 MATH SAT (500 pre-March 2016), MATH 095, or passing the math placement exam for algebra. Restricted to Architecture majors only.

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MATH 155 Statistics for the Behavioral and Social Sciences

Surveys the basic statistical concepts applicable to problems in the behavioral and social sciences. Includes descriptive statistics, regression and correlative, hypothesis testing, nonparametric methods, and analysis of variance. 

Prerequisite: Minimum 530 MATH SAT (500 pre-March 2016), MATH 095, or passing the math placement exam for algebra.

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MATH 160 Analysis of Functions (Pre-calculus)

Designed to prepare students for calculus. Topics studied include inequalities, graphing, polynomials, the fundamental theorem of algebra, rational functions, trigonometric functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, conic sections, polar equations, and parametric equations.

Prerequisite: Minimum 530 MATH SAT (500 pre-March 2016), MATH 095, or passing the math placement exam for algebra.

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MATH 170 Applications of Calculus to the Life Sciences

Applications of differential calculus to biology and the life sciences. 

Prerequisite: “C" or better in MATH 160 or passing the math placement exam for calculus.

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MATH 201 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I

Limits, function, continuity, differentiation, and applications, including related rates and extrema. 

Prerequisite: “C” or better in MATH 160 or passing the math placement exam for calculus.

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MATH 211 Calculus I

Limits, continuity, and differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions; applications of differentiation to related rates and optimization problems; extremum and concavity of functions; antiderivatives, integrals and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; and integration by substitution. Prerequisites: algebra and trigonometry. 

Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 160, or passing the Calculus placement exam.

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MATH 212 Calculus II

Techniques of integration including integration of logarithmic, exponential, hyperbolic, trigonometric and inverse functions; improper integrals; infinite sequences and series; parametric equations; polar coordinates and polar graphs.

Prerequisite: MATH 211.

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MATH 213 Calculus III

Vectors; lines and planes in three-dimensional space; vector-valued functions; functions of several variables; partial derivatives; multiple integrals; and vector Calculus.

Prerequisite: MATH 212.

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MATH 219 History of Mathematics

The study of mathematical concepts from arithmetic to calculus in their historical perspective. This study will be supplemented by historical background material, biographies of mathematicians and translations of source manuscripts in which mathematical discoveries were first announced. Attention will be given to the relationship of mathematics to other disciplines.

For Mathematics majors and minors. Prerequisite: MATH 211.

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MATH 220 Introduction to Probability and Statistics

Acquaints the student with elements of probability, Bayes theorem, measures of central tendency, dispersion, probability distribution, hypothesis tests, nonparametric tests, linear regression, and correlation. 

Prerequisite: MATH 211.

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MATH 271 Transition to Advanced Mathematics

A transition from lower level mathematics courses to higher level courses. Emphasis will be placed on correct reading, understanding, and writing of proofs. Topics will include logic, direct proofs, proof by contrapositive, proof by contradiction, equivalence relations, functions, and mathematical induction. 

Prerequisite: MATH 211.

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MATH 311 Differential Equations

The study of differential equations and first-order linear systems through a combination of analytical, numerical, and qualitative techniques. Topics include the standard analytical methods of solving nth-order linear equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors for systems, phase-plane trajectories, the Laplace transform, and numerical approximations. Technology is used in conjunction with theory to approximate and analyze solutions. Modeling physical phenomena is emphasized through a rich variety of applications.

Prerequisite: MATH 213, 271.

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MATH 321 Abstract Algebra

Provides an introduction to groups, rings, ideals, integral domains and fields.

 Prerequisites: MATH 212, 271.

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MATH 322 Linear Algebra

Deals with vector spaces, matrices, linear transformations, canonical forms, and determinants. 

Must be taken with MATH 322L. Prerequisites: MATH 212, 271.

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MATH 322L Linear Algebra Lab

Laboratory to accompany MATH 322 in order to use a computer algebra system (such as Mathematica or Maple) to provide visual re-enforcement of central concepts.

Must be taken with MATH 322.

1
MATH 323 Theory of Numbers

An introduction to basic number theory: properties of the integers, congruence, Fermat’s and Wilson’s Theorem, number theoretic functions, Diophantine equations, and primes. 

Prerequisites: MATH 212, 271.

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MATH 324 College Geometry

The study of axiomatic systems and the notions of proof and consistency. Examines finite, elliptical, and hyperbolic geometries, and advanced topics in Euclidean Geometry. Software is used to enhance exploration and discovery of theorems. 

Prerequisites: MATH 212, 271.

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MATH 411B Curriculum Methods and Materials in Mathematics

Integrates the theory and practice of teaching. Topics include classroom management, planning, techniques and strategies, evaluation, reading in the content area, and instructional materials and technology. 

Prerequisite: upper level screening approval.

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MATH 420 Discrete Mathematics

An introduction to the algebraic concepts, methods and techniques that form the theoretical basis for computer science, including relevant areas of logic, set theory, relations, and functions, and Boolean algebra.

Prerequisites: MATH 212, 271.

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MATH 425 Topology

Introduction to point-set topology at the undergraduate level. Topics include topological spaces, limit points, continuity, connectedness, compactness, separability, and the fundamental group.

Prerequisites: MATH 213, 271.

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MATH 430 Real Analysis

An introduction to the analysis of real numbers, variables, and functions. Topics include topology of the real numbers, sequences and series, limits, continuity and uniform continuity, differentiation, the Riemann integral, and sequences of functions.

Prerequisites: MATH 213, 271.

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MATH 440 Complex Variables

An introduction to the theory of complex numbers, variables, and functions. Topics include transformations and mappings, elementary and analytic functions, complex integration and Cauchy’s theorem, Taylor and Laurent expansions, residues, harmonic functions, and conformal mappings. 

Prerequisites: MATH 213, 271.

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MATH 447 Special Projects

Definition, formulation, solution, documentation, and testing of a problem under close faculty supervision for a single student.

variable credit
MATH 456 Mathematical Statistics

Deals with probability distributions, limit theorems, estimation, hypothesis tests, correlation and regression, analysis of variance.

Prerequisites: MATH 213, 220.

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MATH 495 Senior Seminar

Analysis of the underlying foundational questions of mathematics including the notions of proof and consistency within a specific mathematical framework. Examination of the considerable impact of mathematics on culture and society from ancient to modern times.

1
MATH 498 Special Topics

This course will cover special topics not available in the current MATH curriculum when significant interest among students and faculty arises.

variable credit
PHYS 112, 112L Introduction to Astronomy

An introduction to astronomy. Topics include basic motions of the sun, moon, and planets; History of astronomy from Copernicus to Newton; properties of telescopes; interaction between light and matter; classification of stars; stellar evolution; black holes and neutron stars; properties of galaxies. Emphasizes the scientific method. Includes use of the Marywood Celestron 8 telescope and computer modeling. The mathematics involved uses only formulas, no trigonometry or beyond. For all majors. Satisfies the science core requirement. Three hours of lecture.

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PHYS 140 Physics for Architects

Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics as they relate to architecture, including forces and vectors, statics, stress, and strain. Also covers heat and thermodynamics, electricity, light and optics, and acoustics. 

Three hours lecture. Architecture majors only. Normally offered spring semester only.

3
PHYS 210 Physical Science

A study of basic concepts related to matter, energy, force, motion, and machines. General features of planet earth and the origin, structure, and evolution of the universe are discussed. 

Three hours lecture; demonstrations. Elementary Education and non-science majors. Normally offered spring semester only.

3
PHYS 303, 303L General Physics

This course provides an introduction to mechanics, fluids, and waves. 

Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Normally offered fall semester only. Science and Mathematics majors only. Prerequisites: algebra and trigonometry; MATH 170 or MATH 211.

4
PHYS 304 General Physics II

Offers lectures and experiments in mechanics, heat, light, sound magnetism, electricity and modern physics.

Involves three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory. Science and Mathematics majors. Normally offered spring semester only. Prerequisites: PHYS 213, PHYS 213L.

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