Science Courses

Code Course Name Description Credits
BIOL 105 DNA Forensics Provides an understanding of the rapidly evolving field of forensics, particularly the use of DNA sequence detection and analysis. Learn about methodologies that identify criminals based on single cell evidence, or in some cases, exonerate those wrongly accused. Three hours lecture. Criminal Justice majors and non-science majors. 3
BIOL 107 Sexually Transmitted Diseases


alternate years)

Discussions on STDs, such as AIDS, chlamydia, genital warts, herpes, emphasizing etiologies, transmission, diagnosis, prophylaxis, and treatment. Includes background information on broad categories of microorganisms, host-parasite relationships, immune defense mechanisms and current therapies. Three hours lecture. Family and Consumer Science majors and non-science majors. 3
BIOL 110, 110L Principles of Biology Surveys life at all levels of organization, ranging from the unicellular to the multicellular forms. Discussions on biological chemistry, reproductive processes, and classification are also included. In laboratory, a hands-on experience wherein students survey life at all levels of organization including biological chemistry, reproductive processes, and organism classification. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Education and non-science majors. 4
BIOL 114, 114L Microbiology for the Health Professional Characterizes features of the broad categories of microorganisms; physical and chemical methods/processes of control; host parasite relationships; airborne, food-water borne, contact-arthropod borne diseases; human defense mechanisms; useful activities of microorganisms. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Nursing majors.Prerequisites: CHEM 121, 121L. 4
BIOL 121, 121L Anatomy and Physiology I Human structure and function are discussed with emphasis on levels of structural organization and body systems, anatomical terminology, homeostasis, cells transport, and tissues. Others are the integumentary, digestive, urinary, endocrine, muscular, and skeletal systems. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Nursing, Nutrition/ Dietetics, Science Education, and Physical Education majors. 4
BIOL 122, 122L Anatomy and Physiology II This course is designed to provide the basic knowledge of how the organ systems of the body function to preserve an optimal internal environment. The anatomy and physiological phenomena of the respiratory, lymphatic, cardiovascular, reproductive, lymphatic, genitourinary system, nutrition, metabolism, digestion, and the central nervous systems will be discussed. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Nursing, Nutrition/Dietetics, Science Education, Physical Education majors. 4
BIOL 130 Principles of Anatomy and Physiology This course is designed to discuss the basic concepts in anatomy and physiology and develop an understanding of the interrelationships between the different organs and systems. Emphasis is on the anatomy and physiological phenomena of the levels of structural organization and body systems, lymphatic, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, integumentary, and the central nervous system. Three hours lecture. Non-science majors and CSD majors. 3
BIOL 150, 150L General Biology I This course is designed to introduce students to foundational concepts in biology, including: biological constituents, cellular organization, protein synthesis, mitosis, and meiosis. The second part of this course studies the basic structure and function of representative animals. Causes and nature of biological diversity and ecological principles are discussed. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. BIOL 150, 150L are prerequisites for BIOL 151, 151L. Science majors. 4
BIOL 151, 151L General Biology II This course is designed to introduce students to foundational concepts in biology, including: biological constituents, cellular organization, protein synthesis, mitosis, and meiosis. The second part of this course studies the basic structure and function of representative animals. Causes and nature of biological diversity and ecological principles are discussed. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. BIOL 150, 150L are prerequisites for BIOL 151, 151L. Science majors. 4
BIOL 201, 201L Human Gross Anatomy This course will discuss the gross anatomy of the human body from a regional point of view, using basic structure-function concept and clinical applications as the basis for anatomical understanding. The physiology, embryology, and histology will also be emphasized especially when they provide anatomical understanding. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Students who have not had a basic anatomy and physiology course may consider taking BIOL 121, 121L as a prerequisite course. Science majors. 4
BIOL 202, 202L Human Physiology This course will provide students with an understanding of the function and regulation of the human body and physiological integration of the organ systems to maintain homeostasis. The course will cover all major aspects of the physiology of the human body including cellular structure and function, and the integration, organization, and control of the organism's body systems. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Students who have not had a basic anatomy and physiology course may consider taking BIOL 122, 122L as a prerequisite course. Science majors. 4
BIOL 233, 233L Molecular Microbiology An introduction to topics in microbiology, biotechnology, and nutragenomics as they relate to the food industries. The beneficial and detrimental effects of microorganisms, as well as the recent developments in genetic engineering will be discussed. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisite: CHEM 310. Nutrition and Dietetics majors. 3
BIOL 235, 235L General Microbiology The broad categories of microorganisms and microscopic systems are covered: morphology, cultivation, reproductive features, microbial genetics, biochemical traits, and taxonomy. Also an introduction to environmental, industrial and medical microbiology provided. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, 150L; BIOL 151, 151L. Science majors. 4
BIOL 281 Introduction to Biotechnology. This course introduces students to the basic concepts of biotechnology and to the application of biotechnology methodologies and applications in various fields. We will consider specific topics related to agricultural biotechnology, bioremediation, genomics, and others. Considerable emphasis is placed on critical evaluation of biotechnology, e.g. ethical considerations, inherent caveats and opportunities for improvements in the field. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, 150L, 151, 151L. Science majors. 3
BIOL 302 Bioinformatics (Bi-level course) This course will train students in computer technology to understand and interpret biological and biochemical data. We will focus on database and sequence comparisons, genomics and proteomics analysis, computer simulation and modeling, utilization of software and hardware, and laboratory data collection and analysis. Junior and senior science majors and M.S. Biotechnology graduate students. 3
BIOL 305 Fundamentals of Neuroscience Outlines basic concepts in neuroscience including: neurons, glial cells, the action potential and mechanisms of neurotransmitter action. Neuroanatomy will be examined and specific functions of brain regions will be explored in terms of learning and memory, language, behavioral neuroendocrinology, and neurological and psychiatric disorders. Junior and senior science and psychology majors. 3
BIOL 332, 332L Immunology (Bi-level course) Studies immune responses in the human body and describes the current diagnostic and analytical techniques. The course focuses at the cellular and molecular levels of the immune response, which includes topics on B-cell development/activation and T-cell development/activation. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisites: BIOL 235, 235L; CHEM 131, 131L; CHEM 132, 132L. Junior and senior science majors and M.S. Biotechnology graduate students. 4
BIOL 351 Evolution (alternate years) Investigates the origin of life, geological time, the fossil record, and evolutionary mechanisms. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: BIOL 150, 150L; BIOL 151, 151L. Science majors. 3
BIOL 383 Emerging Medicines and Technologies (Bi-level course) This course will focus on new scientific discoveries that affect, or promise to affect, mankind. The emerging medicines covered in this course include gene therapy, anti-obesity and anti-aging drugs, mental illness treatments, genetic testing, and cancer research topics. An understanding of the biological basis of each emerging medicine will be focal. Junior and senior science majors and M.S. Biotechnology graduate students. Prerequisites: BIOL 235, 235L, CHEM 331, 331L, 332, 332L. 3
BIOL 401 Cell Culture (Bi-level course) This course is designed to provide students with fundamental skills in cell and tissue culture. The techniques include media preparation, sterile technique, primary culture establishment, cell growth and maintenance, transfection, cloning of cultured cells. Junior and senior science majors and M.S. Biotechnology graduate students. Three hour lecture with lab. Prerequisites: BIOL 235, 235L, CHEM 132, 132L. 3
BIOL 410 Science Literacy Capstone Group discussions on current scientific topics with an emphasis on utilizing the Internet as a source of information. Preparing a professional resume, conducting a job search, tips on interviewing, and applying to graduate or professional schools are covered. Typical expectations involve an oral presentation and the submission of a scientific paper. Junior and senior science majors. 2
BIOL 411B Curriculum Methods and Materials Topics included are theoretically based methods and materials for science education in a classroom and laboratory setting. Addresses strengths, practical concerns, and apprehensions of prospective science educators. Computer software applications to education. Prerequisite: EDUC 411A. Science Education majors. 4
BIOL 421, 421L Biochemistry (Bi-level course) This course covers basic concepts in biochemistry, emphasizing the structure, reactivity, and dynamics of proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates. In addition, a brief overview of carbohydrate metabolism, including the electron transport system and oxidative phosphorylation processes, are presented. Laboratory component involves learning advanced analytical skills related to topics covered in lecture. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisites: BIOL 235, 235L, CHEM 332, 332L. Junior and senior science majors and M.S. Biotechnology graduate students. 4
BIOL 440, 440L Molecular and Cellular Biology (Bi-level course) Provides a working understanding of eukaryotic gene expression and control at the transcriptional and translational levels; cellular communication and signaling; and cellular growth, division, development and formation of cancers. Emphasis will be on recent advances in the fields of molecular biology and biotechnology. Three-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Lab is designed to provide experience in DNA and RNA manipulation, PCR, gene cloning. Prerequisites: BIOL 235, 235L, CHEM 132, 132L. Junior and senior science majors and M.S. Biotechnology students. 4
BIOL 446, 446L Genetics (Bi-level course) Presents an introduction to Mendelian inheritance, recombinant DNA technology, and genomics. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory. Prerequisites: BIOL 235, 235L, CHEM 132, 132L. Junior and senior science majors and M.S. Biotechnology students. 4
BIOL 454 Undergraduate Research Requires laboratory or library research on an assigned problem. Hours are arranged by the advisor. Prerequisites: QPA minimum 2.50 and approval of the Science Department chair. A public demonstration of the research may be requested. Junior and senior science majors. 2
BIOL 455 Senior Biotechnology Research Project. Provides the student with a hands-on laboratory project, or Internet/bioinformatics-based project. Can involve elements of biology, chemistry, environmental science, et al. Research paper or presentation required. Senior Science (Biotechnology) majors only. 2
BIOL 498 Internship The student works in a commercial laboratory facility gaining experience and expertise in the student's area of specialization. Credit is earned by providing a report and/or presentation to the department, following the internship period, e.g. during the following semester. Arranged with approval of the Science Department chairperson. Junior and senior science majors. 3
BIOL 499 Independent Study Arranged only with special permission of department chairperson. Junior and senior science majors. 1, 2, or 3
BIOL 520 Literature Review This selected topics course will provide an in-depth review and discussion of important current publications related to modern science and industry. The course will focus on several broad areas in biotechnology. In several instances it will include readings that relate basic advances in modern science to biomedicine and industry. M.S. Biotechnology majors. A public presentation is also required. 2
BIOL 530 Laboratory Instruction This course will cover a variety of components related to teaching an undergraduate introductory laboratory course. These include writing a syllabus, grading procedures, conducting a laboratory session, safety issues in the laboratory, and teaching strategies. Graduate students enrolled in this course will assist an instructor of a 100-level undergraduate science laboratory course in a number of activities, such as laboratory demonstrations, assisting with laboratory preparation, answering student questions about the laboratory experiments, etc. The graduate student enrolled in this course will neither be the instructor of record nor the evaluator of students' laboratory performances. M.S. Biotechnology majors. 2
BIOL 595 Research Provides the student with a hands-on laboratory project, or bioinformatics-based project. Can involve elements of biology, chemistry, environmental science, et al. Formal write-up of findings and public presentation required. 1 or 2
CHEM 100 Basic Chemistry Designed for students with insufficient background for university-level chemistry; emphasizes the concepts and principles necessary for a basic understanding of chemistry. Three hours lecture. Non-science majors. 3
CHEM 105 Chemistry for the Artist Presents fundamental principles of chemistry as well as light and color theory for the artist. Application of principles to ceramics, glass, pigments, metals, modern synthetics, cleansing agents, and other household consumer products. Three hours lecture. Art and non-science majors. 3
CHEM 110 Introductory Chemistry Studies basic chemical concepts and principles, with emphasis on the quantitative aspects of real chemistry. Three hours lecture. Dietetics and Elementary Education majors. 3
CHEM 121, 121L Principles of Chemistry Studies basic general chemistry, with emphasis on medical and environmental applications. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Nursing and non-science majors. 4
CHEM 131, 131L General Chemistry I The first part of this course studies the stoichiometric relationship between atoms, their chemical reactions, and the fundamental theories describing the structure, bonding, orbitals of atoms, and phases of matter. In part II of this course, topics covered include thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, acid/base chemistry, and solubility products. Laboratory experiments are primarily quantitative in nature. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisite for CHEM 131, 131L a minimum of 1 year high school chemistry; CHEM 131, 131L are prerequisites for CHEM 132, 132L. Science majors. 4
CHEM 132, 132L General Chemistry II The first part of this course studies the stoichiometric relationship between atoms, their chemical reactions, and the fundamental theories describing the structure, bonding, orbitals of atoms, and phases of matter. In part II of this course, topics covered include thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, acid/base chemistry, and solubility products. Laboratory experiments are primarily quantitative in nature. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisite for CHEM 131, 131L a minimum of 1 year high school chemistry; CHEM 131, 131L are prerequisites for CHEM 132, 132L. Science majors. 4
CHEM 210, 210L Introductory Organic Chemistry Studies a brief survey of the classes of carbon compounds -- nomenclature, properties, reactions of the functional groups. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisite: CHEM 110. Nutrition and Dietetics majors. 3
CHEM 310 Introduction to Biochemistry Deals with the chemistry of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and enzymes. Also involves the study of carbohydrate metabolism to include glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, and the electron transport system. Prerequisites: CHEM 210, 210L. Nutrition and Dietetics majors. 3
CHEM 312 Environmental Chemistry alternate years Studies chemical theories of aquatic and atmospheric chemistry, chemical cycles and properties of pollutants and hazardous wastes. An introduction to toxicological chemistry. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: CHEM 331, 331L; CHEM 332, 332L. Junior and senior science majors. 3
CHEM 331, 331L Organic Chemistry II Offers an in-depth study of the properties of the major classes of organic compounds, covering methods of identification, preparation structure, bonding. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisites for CHEM 331, 331L are CHEM 132, 132L. Prerequisites for CHEM 332, 332L are CHEM 331, 331L. Science majors. 4
CHEM 332, 332L Organic Chemistry I Offers an in-depth study of the properties of the major classes of organic compounds, covering methods of identification, preparation structure, bonding. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisites for CHEM 331, 331L are CHEM 132, 132L. Prerequisites for CHEM 332, 332L are CHEM 331, 331L. Science majors. 4
CHEM 398, 398L Chemical Analysis (alternate years) A broad-based study of the techniques, instrumentation, and data collection methods used in chemical analysis. This course is designed for students whose ultimate professional interests are in medicine, biochemistry, molecular biology, or earth science. Laboratory experiments will correspond with lecture material. Data interpretation will also be discussed. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: CHEM 332, 332L, MATH 216. Junior and senior science majors. 3
CHEM 499 Independent Study Arranged only with special permission of department chairperson. Open to junior and senior science majors. Environmental Science courses that have a lecture and a laboratory component must be taken concurrently for a total of four credits. 1, 2 or 3
ENVS 109 Technology, Environment and Society Issues included are: depletion of energy resources, environmental degradation, and biotechnology. The course is designed to give the student an in-depth understanding of selected topics in relationship to ethics, philosophy, economics, and consumerism. Non-science majors. 3
ENVS 210 Water: The Essential Ingredient An introduction to the environmental sciences, emphasizing the value of water as a natural resource. Topics include: scientific measurement, pH, the ecology of natural populations, water use and supply, water pollution, acid rain, the greenhouse effect, water purification, water power, and aqua culture. Involves lecture-demonstration. Non-science majors. 3
ENVS 212, 212L Introduction to Meteorology This course introduces the study of earth's atmosphere and its associated weather phenomena. Topics include: origin, evolution, structure, and characteristics of earth's atmosphere; moisture; pressure; storm dynamics; fronts; meteorological equipment; local and global weather patterns; and weather forecasting. Emphasis is placed on visuals, realtime, and compiled weather data, including satellite and radar imagery, computer modeling, and weather map analysis. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Science, Aviation, and non-science majors. 3
ENVS 215 Resource Conservation I Designed to provide the student with an awareness of natural resources. Considers resource use in light of its impact on the natural environment. Part I examines fundamental resources such as soil, water, forests, and wildlife. Part II includes controversial topics such as energy, nuclear power, pollution, and the use of pesticides. Science and non-science majors. 3
ENVS 216 Resource Conservation II Designed to provide the student with an awareness of natural resources. Considers resource use in light of its impact on the natural environment. Part I examines fundamental resources such as soil, water, forests, and wildlife. Part II includes controversial topics such as energy, nuclear power, pollution, and the use of pesticides. Science and non-science majors. 3
ENVS 261 Earth Science I -- Geology Studies the physical earth -- minerals, rocks, mountains, valleys, glaciers, volcanoes, and earthquakes. Three hours lecture and demonstration. Science and non-science majors. 3
ENVS 262 Earth Science II -- Oceanography, Meteorology Investigates oceans and weather systems of the earth and their importance to society. Topics include ocean life, ocean resources, marine habitats, marine policy, and exploration. Three hours lecture and demonstrations. Science and non-science majors. 3
ENVS 300+ ENVS Specialty Course

Experts in various fields of ENVS will offer courses in their area of expertise.

Junior and senior science majors.

4-6
ENVS 340 Environmental Law Overview of the field of environmental law and the major related statutes. Explores particular categories, issues and concerns that affect society and government. Environmental Science and non-science majors. 3
ENVS 345 Environmental Management and Policy Course topics include an examination of environmental policy and the relationship between local, state, and federal agencies. The responsibilities of industry and the role of society in decision-making regarding environmental issues are addressed. Three hours lecture. Environmental Science and non-science majors. 3
ENVS 420, 420L Ecology (Bi-level course) Investigates the relationship between living organisms and their natural environment. Emphasizes the existence of natural species and their interactions with other life forms. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Junior and senior science majors and M.S. Biotechnology graduate students. 4
ENVS 454 Undergraduate Research Requires laboratory or library research on an assigned problem. Hours are arranged by the advisor. Prerequisites: QPA minimum 2.50 and approval of the chair of the Science Department. A public demonstration of the research may be requested. Junior and senior science majors. 2
ENVS 498 Internship The student works in an actual commercial laboratory facility gaining experience and expertise in the student's area of specialization. Arranged with approval of the Science Department chairperson. Junior and senior science majors. 3
ENVS 499 Independent Study Arranged only with special permission of department chairperson. Junior and senior science majors. 1, 2 or 3
ENVS 625 Environmental Management and Policy

Course topics include an examination of environmental policy and the relationship between local, state, and federal agencies. The responsibilities of industry and the role of society in decision-making regarding environmental issues are addressed.

3
MT -1 Urinalysis and Body Fluids In this course, students will study the anatomy and physiology of the kidney and excretory system. Students will be able to discuss and explain the medical biochemistry of renal function, the histology of the kidney and glomerulus, and the interpretation of urinalysis tests. Emphasis for this course is on specimen collection and preservation, laboratory test procedures, clinical microscopy, histology of urine sediment, clinical significance and interpretation of laboratory results. The course also covers laboratory procedures and clinical significance of analysis of spinal fluid, seminal fluid, and other body fluids commonly examined in the laboratory. Lectures, text reading assignments, lab exercises, and problem-based case studies are used to teach this course. 2 class hours, 2 laboratory hours per day. 3
MT -10 Seminar The seminar is designed to develop the student's understanding and evaluation of published research design and practice. The seminar prepares the student to be an informed consumer of research published in the field. The course is designed to develop the student's use of the library and Internet resources, evaluation of research, critical thinking skills, and oral presentation skills. The student is responsible for topic selection, literature search, presentation development, and poster board presentation. This project is completed with the guidance of the program director. A professional oral presentation and poster required for this course. 1
MT -11 Histology Technique This course provides a comprehensive survey and experience of the histologic procedures that take place in the preparation of a tissue sample for examination by the pathologists. These procedures include gross dissection, tissue processing, tissue fixation, embedding, microtoming, routine staining and immunochemical staining. The student will apply and demonstrate basic histologic techniques in an authentic clinical setting and prepare their own slides. 40 clinical contact hours. 0
MT -2 Hematology and Coagulation This course is a comprehensive study of the hemopoietic and hemostasis systems. Major concepts of this course are the histology and morphology of normal and abnormal red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Students will study the medical biochemistry of iron deficiency, vitamin B12/Folate deficiency anemia and the medical biochemistry of various hemoglobinopathies, determination of blood measurements in anemias, leukemias and other blood diseases; the medical biochemistry of coagulation, fibrinolysis, coagulopathies, and laboratory procedures for coagulation testing will be covered in detail. Emphasis is on histology and morphology of red and white blood cells, biochemical test principles, analytical procedures, and clinical interpretation of routine and special tests. The course is presented using lectures, lab exercises, and problem-based case studies. 2 class hours, 3 laboratory hours per day. 5
MT -3 Clinical Biochemistry This course is designed to give the student a comprehensive and sequential overview to the study of medical biochemistry and human pathophysiology. The contents of this course will introduce the student to specimen collection, transport and storage, specimen variable, and laboratory mathematics. This course will also cover the concepts of Spectral techniques, immunoassays, quality control and quality assurance. This course is intended to present the concepts of chemical principles, reference ranges, test method evaluation and clinical significance of the following selected chemical components: carbohydrates, non-protein nitrogen, electrolytes, acid-base physiology, blood gas physiology, proteins, lipids, enzymes, liver function, cardiac markers, tumor markers, endocrinology, vitamins, and calcium-phosphorus metabolism. The student will also be introduced to the topics of toxicology and therapeutic drug monitoring. 2 class hours, 2 laboratory hours per day. 6
MT -4 Immunohematology Introduction to immunohematology and blood banking. This course covers the biochemistry, genetics, and laboratory techniques for the testing of ABO, Rh and other blood group systems. Emphasis is on ABO grouping, RH typing, direct anti-globulin testing, indirect anti-globulin testing, pre-transfusion (compatibility) testing, antibody identification with panels, component preparation and storage, transfusion therapy, donor requirements for blood donation, fetal-maternal blood banning and pre-natal testing, and quality assurance in the blood bank. 2 class hours, 2 laboratory hours per day. 3
MT -5 Medical Immunology/Serology This course is the study of biochemistry and physiology of the immune system to include the study of humeral and cell mediated immunity, complement, hypersensitivity, auto-immunity, immunodeficiency, tumor immunology, transplant immunology, viral hepatitis, and the serology of infectious diseases such as syphilis, Rubella, HIV, and Epstein Bar Virus. Emphasis is on biochemical principles, laboratory procedures, clinical significance and interpretation of laboratory results. Laboratory tests include antibody quantitation, agglutination tests, immunoelectrophoresis, fluorescent antibody tests, enzyme immunoassay, PCR, and Western Blot techniques. 2 class hours, 2 laboratory hours per day. 3
MT -6 Medical Parasitology This course is the study of medically important parasites of man. Topics include the introduction to the theory, practical application, technical performance, and evaluation of procedures for isolation and identification of medically important parasites of man and other animals. Emphasis is on the identification of Nematodes, Cestodes, Trematodes, Protozoans and Sporozoans, and the study of their life cycles and laboratory techniques. 2 class hours, 1.5 laboratory hours per day. 1.5
MT -7 Medical Bacteriology-Virology This course is a comprehensive study of medically important pathogenic bacteria. Course topics include: specimen handling, staining methods, media/culture methods, rapid diagnostic tests, serologic grouping, taxonomy, morphology, metabolism, pathology, and growth requirements and biochemical characteristics, culture techniques, biochemical identification, transmission, and antibiotic susceptibility testing of medically important bacteria, mycobacteria, rickettsia, and viruses. Fundamentals of virology including structure, classification and pathology, and laboratory techniques. 2 class hours, 3 laboratory hours per day. 7
MT -8 Medical Mycology Mycology is the study of pathogenic fungi medically important to man. Topics included are classification, nomenclature, methods of culture and colony morphology and identification, identification of genus and species based on microscopic morphology of selected fungal species, study of fungal diseases and anti-fungal therapy. 2 class hours, 1 laboratory hour per day. 1.5
MT -9 Laboratory Management/Education This is a student self-directed study of the principles of managing a clinical laboratory. Emphasis is on leadership theory, human resource management, communications, marketing, budgeting, problem-solving, regulatory issues, inventory, and laboratory information systems. Educational topics include: learning theories, program development and evaluation, instruction media, domains of learning, and test development. 15-20 total class and project hours. 1
PHYS 112, 112L Introduction to Astronomy A study of the history and evolution of the cosmos. Topics include basic motions of the sun, moon, and planets; telescopes; classification of stars; and stellar evolution. Emphasizes the scientific method. Includes night observing sessions with a large telescope. Lab data collected involves computer modeling, use of telescope, and Internet resources. The course is designed for students with limited mathematical application. Three hours lecture, 2 hours lab. Science and non-science majors. 4
PHYS 140 Physics for Architects Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics as they relate to architecture, including forces and vectors, statics, stress and strain. Also covers heat and thermo-dynamics, electricity, light and optics, and acoustics. Three hours lecture. Architecture majors only. 3
PHYS 210 Physical Science A study of basic concepts related to matter, energy, force, motion, and machines. General features of planet earth and the origin, structure, and evolution of the universe are discussed. Three hours lecture; demonstrations. Elementary Education and non-science majors. 3
PHYS 213, 213L General Physics I This course provides an introduction to mechanics, fluids and waves. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Science and Mathematics majors. Prerequisites: algebra and trigonometry; MATH 170 or MATH 201. 4
PHYS 214, 214L General Physics II This course provides an introduction to electricity and magnetism, heat and optics. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Science and Mathematics majors. Prerequisites: PHYS 213, PHYS 213L. 4