Courses

Nutrition, Athletic Training, and Exercise Science Courses

Code Course Name Description Credits
ATES 111

These are activity courses, designed to improve physical fitness. Activities may include aerobic dance, slimnastics, jogging, walking, karate.

1
ATES 111R Weight Lifting and Conditioning

Develop proper skills and techniques for safe weight training and program design. Learn major muscle groups and their actions. Generally offered every semester.

1
ATES 112 Selected Sports

These are seasonal team and individual sports, including tennis, golf, badminton, bowling, gymnastics, dance, volleyball, basketball, field hockey, and racquetball. May involve additional fees.

1
ATES 113 Swimming for the Timid Nonswimmer

For the student with no swimming ability. Student will learn the basic strokes.

1
ATES 115 Basic Aquatics

For the student with little swimming ability, who is comfortable in deep water. Student will learn the five basic strokes and water safety skills.

1
ATES 120 Lifeguard Training

Designed for the student who wishes to become a certified lifeguard.

Prerequisite: intermediate swimming level.

1
ATES 121 Water Safety Instructor

Designed for the student who possesses a better-than-average swimming ability. Training and the practical application of knowledge and skills in swimming leads to certification as an American National Red Cross Safety Instructor.

Prerequisite: intermediate swimming level.

1
ATES 130 Emergency Response for Athletic Trainers

Course is designed to provide knowledge and experience in emergency care procedures, blood borne pathogens, and first aid. Students will receive certification in CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer and in First Aid, upon successful completion of course. Involves fee.

2
ATES 155 Pre-Clinical Experience in Athletic Training I

Gives students applying for admission into the athletic training education program exposure to clinical education and learning. Involves fee.

1
ATES 160 Foundation of Physical Education

An introductory course about the services by physical education teachers, physical activity professionals, coaches, fitness trainers, athletic trainers, and athletic administrators emphasizing professionalism, quality programs, heritage, and the changing philosophies within sport and physical activity. Offered spring semester.

3
ATES 180 Introduction to Athletic Training

An introductory course designed to expose interested students to athletic training. The course centers around familiarizing students with the variety of subject areas needed to become an athletic trainer. 

BIOL 121, 121L to be taken concurrently. Involves fee. Offered fall semester.

3
ATES 201 Team Sports

This course introduces students to the basic principles involved in planning, teaching, and assessment of a variety of team games including, but not limited to, field hockey, basketball, soccer, baseball, softball, volleyball, floor hockey, ultimate Frisbee, flag football, and team handball.

 No prior experience in all activities is required. Offered fall semester.

2
ATES 202 Recreation Sports

This course introduces students to the basic principles involved in planning, teaching, and assessment of a variety of recreation games including but not limited to, bowling, golf, badminton, tennis, and lawn games. 

No prior experience in all activities is required. Offered fall semester.

2
ATES 203 Individual Sports

This course introduces students to the basic principles involved in planning, teaching, and assessment of a variety of individual games including but not limited to, track and field, dance and educational gymnastics.

 No prior experience in all activities is required. Offered spring semester.

2
ATES 204 Teaching Group Exercise

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the educational concepts, performance techniques, program design, and leadership skills needed to teach instructor-led exercise programs. The course will include basic analysis and application of safe and effective exercise procedures for all fitness levels. This class involves a high degree of practical experience, and you can expect to workout often. 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ATES 221, 210, 225, and 225L.

2
ATES 210 Anatomical Concepts in ATES

This course reviews and expands upon selected topics of anatomy and physiology relative to the Health and Physical Education major. Systems emphasized are: skeletal, muscular, nervous, lymphatic, and circulatory. Organ function and location is also highlighted. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 121, 121L, 122, 122L, ATES 221 taken concurrently. Offered fall semester.

1
ATES 215 Introduction to Sports Medicine

Covers fundamentals of basic emergency procedures applicable to the physical education classroom and presents a basic introduction to conditioning and the care of the more common athletic injuries.

Prerequisites: BIOL 121, 121L, 122, 122L.

2
ATES 221 Kinesiology and Applied Anatomy

Presents practical application of human anatomy to sport with the major emphasis on the biomechanical analysis of movement. Involves fee. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 121, 121L, 122, 122L. ATES 210 taken concurrently. Offered fall semester.

3
ATES 225 and 225L Physiology of Exercise and Lab

Presents a comprehensive study of the human body subjected to physical stress in relation to sports and athletics. Particularly emphasizes the relationship of metabolism, environmental stress and body composition to optimal performance. Involves fee. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 121, 121L, 122, 122L. Must enroll in ATES 225L concurrently. Offered spring semester.

3
ATES 236 Tests and Measurements

Designed to introduce the student to the basic principles of testing and evaluating performances through the development of assessment devices and the use of standardized tests.

Offered spring semester.

3
ATES 275 Research in Athletic Training

Interpretation of statistical procedures and research designs commonly used in athletic training research. Prepares students to conduct research projects related to the field of athletic training.

3
ATES 308 Concepts in Athletic Training

This course will address current concepts, such as injury/illness prevention, evidence-based practice, professional position statements and sport specific requirements as they relate to athletic training. Involves fee.

 Prerequisites: BIOL 121, 121L, 122, 122L; ATES 130, 155, 180. Offered fall semester.

3
ATES 311 Evaluation and Assessment for Athletic Trainers I

Introduces the student to fundamentals of injury evaluation. Emphasis is placed on evaluation of injuries to the foot, ankle/lower leg, knee, hip, thigh, and pelvis. 

Prerequisites: ATES 221, 308. Must also enroll in ATES 311L. Offered spring semester.

3
ATES 311L Evaluation and Assessment for Athletic Trainers I Lab

Provides opportunity for the student to apply evaluation techniques learned in ATES 311.

Offered spring semester.

1
ATES 313 Evaluation and Assessment for Athletic Trainers II

Continues to introduce athletic injury evaluation techniques to the student. Emphasis is placed on evaluation of injuries to the shoulder, upper arm/elbow/forearm, wrist/hand, head/face, spine, and thorax/abdomen/visceral.

Prerequisites: ATES 311. Must also enroll in ATES 313L. Offered fall semester.

3
ATES 313L Evaluation and Assessment for Athletic Trainers II Lab

Practice application of materials learned in ATES 313. 

Offered fall semester.

1
ATES 324 Motor Learning and Movement Education

Introduces motor theory and its application in teaching of motor skills. Also discusses movement activities as a means of cognitive and motor development. 

Offered spring semester.

2
ATES 350 Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training I

Athletic training psychomotor skills are enhanced and assessed by a preceptor during clinical rotations. Emphasis is on competencies and proficiencies previously instructed in didactic courses. Involves fee.

3
ATES 351 Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training II

Athletic training psychomotor skills are enhanced and assessed by a preceptor during clinical rotations. Emphasis is on competencies and proficiencies previously instructed in didactic courses. Involves fee.

Prerequisite: ATES 350. with C or better.

3
ATES 360 Exercise Testing and Prescription

Provides information aimed at fitness professionals whose clientele are considered apparently healthy adults as well as the special populations such as pregnant women, children, elderly, and pulmonary patients. Focuses on physical fitness assessment and exercise prescription and includes 1) use of field tests and laboratory tests to appraise physical fitness levels; 2) designs of individualized physical fitness programs; and 3) evaluation of exercise programs. 

Prerequisites: BIOL 121, 121L, 122, 122L; PED 221, 225 (or taken concurrently). Offered spring semester.

3
ATES 360L Exercise Testing and Prescription Lab

This course covers laboratory and field tests used for assessing physical fitness components as well as principles of exercise prescription. Test results are used in developing individualized exercise prescriptions to improve cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular fitness, body weight and body composition, and flexibility.

Prerequisites: Current enrollment in ATES 360. Offered spring semester.

1
ATES 380 Exercise and Disease Prevention

This course will follow the American College of Sports Medicine mantra that “Exercise is Medicine.” Throughout the semester students will identify and analyze current disease issues related to exercise, physical activity, and lifestyle. Topics covered include diabetes, cardiopulmonary diseases, cancer, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and autoimmune disorders.

Involves fee. Offered fall semester.

3
ATES 400 Therapeutic Modalities

Theories and concepts in the appropriate application and utilization of therapeutic modalities in the treatment of athletic injuries.

Prerequisites: ATES 308. Must also enroll in ATES 401. Offered spring semester.

3
ATES 401 Therapeutic Modalities Lab

A supervised laboratory experience to ensure that students develop the appropriate psychomotor skills in applying and using therapeutic modalities safely.

Offered spring semester.

1
ATES 410 Therapeutic Exercise

Theories and concepts in the appropriate application and utilization of therapeutic exercises in the rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries.

Prerequisites: ATES 311, 400. Must also enroll in ATES 411. Offered fall semester.

3
ATES 411 Therapeutic Exercise Lab

A supervised laboratory experience to ensure that students develop the appropriate psychomotor skills in applying and using rehabilitation techniques. 

Offered fall semester.

1
ATES 418 General Medical Conditions for the Athletic Trainer

The recognition, evaluation, management, and treatment of non-orthopedic medical conditions that affect the physically active population. Pharmacological application of therapeutic medications commonly prescribed for acute and chronic health problems and injuries are also covered. 

Prerequisites: ATES 313, 400.

4
ATES 421 Coaching

Concentrates on coaching techniques and strategies, responsibilities of a coach, standards for conducting a sports program, and basic psychology of coaching. 

Offered spring semester.

2
ATES 424 Organization and Administration of Physical Education


spring

This course will help prepare students for entry into the athletic training, physical activity, or education professional fields. This course will address administration responsibilities, professional and ethical practices, job seeking, and interview skills. Offered spring semester.

3
ATES 440 Advanced Exercise Physiology


fall

This is an advanced undergraduate course in the physiology of exercise dealing with acute and chronic responses of various systems to exercise and training. Experimental design and data collection techniques commonly used in exercise science literature will be addressed. Mini-experiments will be utilized to demonstrate various physiological responses in the exercise arena. Special emphasis will be given to environmental physiology (altitude, temperature, underwater and microgravity environments) and its impact on human performance. 

Prerequisites: ATES 225, ATES 225L, ATES 360, ATES 360L, ATES 380, and a valid CPR certification. Offered fall semester.

3
ATES 450 Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training III

Athletic training psychomotor skills are enhanced and assessed by a preceptor during clinical rotations. Emphasis is on competencies and proficiencies previously instructed in didactic courses.

Involves fee. Prerequisite: Completion of ATES 350, 351 with a C or better.

4
ATES 451 Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training IV

Athletic training psychomotor skills are enhanced and assessed by a preceptor during clinical rotations. Emphasis is on competencies and proficiencies previously instructed in didactic courses.

Involves fee. Prerequisite: Completion of ATES 350, 351, 450 with a C or better.

4
ATES 455C Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training

Affords the student the opportunity to work directly with a certified athletic trainer in a variety of sports medicine settings. Opportunity will be provided for experience in additional medical settings. 

Involves fee. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance to professional phase of the ATP.

variable
ATES 457 Sports and Recreation Management

This course is designed to prepare prospective personal trainers, managers, directors, and program coordinators for employment and management of sport and fitness settings. Emphasis will be placed on facility design and layout, human resource management, fiscal management, marketing and risk management.

3
ATES 460 Senior Seminar


spring

This course will discuss skills, strategies, and tactics specific to the athletic trainer.

Prerequisite: Senior class status, within one semester of graduation. Offered spring semester.

2
ATES 475 Clinical Exercise Physiology


spring

The course is designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to address the role of the clinical exercise physiologist in the exercise management of patients with chronic diseases and disabilities. Practice areas will include cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, neoplastic, immunologic, and hemotologic disorders. Students will learn and become competent in 12-lead EKG set-up and interpretation. 

Prerequisites: ATES 225, ATES 225L, ATES 360, ATES 360L, ATES 380, ATES 425, and a valid CPR certification. Offered spring semester.

3
ATES 480 A,B Exercise Science Practicum

A guided practical experience with an appropriate organization required for Physical Activity majors. This course requires 120 hours of contact time with a specified site supervisor, with the purpose of affording students an opportunity to gain hands-on experience in an employment setting similar to their aimed profession. This course requires a one hour meeting at the beginning of the semester with the University supervisor to go over roles and course expectations for the semester.

3 credits each
ATES 495 Senior Seminar

This seminar is designed to orient students to Exercise Science graduate programs and serves as a forum for exchange of research in the field. Emphasis is placed on student’s oral presentation with class interactions. Critical thinking and evaluation of research in literature is included. Concepts and issues raised by students are reviewed and further discussed with leadership of the instructor. Integration of previous exercise science course material as well as recent issues are the objectives of this course. Meets bi-weekly. Prerequisites: Final semester of senior year.

0.5
ATES 499 Independent Study

Offered for students who desire to do research and study on an individual basis. 

Approval of the department chairperson and dean is required.

variable credit
FCS 131 Apparel/Textile Management

In this course, students will learn and refine a variety of garment and artistic sewing construction skills. Students will participate in projects for personal use, service learning, and recycling projects. Pattern reading will be included as the projects are completed.

3
FCS 145 A Behavioral Approach to Textiles and Housing

This course studies man’s behavior related to textiles and housing. The course includes the psychological and sociological aspects of clothing and housing choices. Standards for home planning, architectural styles, and needs of the family influence housing choices are also part of the course.

3
FCS 251 Family Resource Management

This course will focus on the management of individual and family resources, including food, clothing, shelter, health care, recreation, and transportation across the lifespan. The relationship of the environment to family and consumer resources will be explored along with the impact of technology on individual and family resources. Individual and family financial management, and consumer rights and responsibilities will also be part to the course.

3
FCS 300, 301 Early Childhood Curriculum I, II

Presents a conceptual framework for learning and development from pre-kindergarten through grade three, in conjunction with practical “hands-on” activities. Encompasses modern theory and research, curriculum development, early intervention, preschool, and kindergarten. Emphasis on developmentally appropriate practice. Prerequisite: PSYC 251.

Prerequisite: PSY 251.

3,3
FCS 320 Professional Practice for Family and Consumer Sciences

This course will follow the history and philosophies of the groups and individuals who had an impact on building family and consumer sciences as a program of study. The roles and responsibilities of professionals in this field will be addressed. The factors that contributed to the development of the profession and the outlook for the future will be developed.

3
FCS 411B Curriculum Methods and Materials/Vocational Education

Gives students the opportunity to plan, organize, and present units of work in their specific fields. Uses materials in the curriculum laboratory to familiarize prospective teachers with courses of study, textbooks, and other instructional materials. Includes recent federal vocational acts, appropriations, and amendments. Discusses occupational education within area vocational-technical schools and strategies for the teacher within these programs.

3
FCS 448 Community Services

Studies the agencies in the community that serve the needs of family over the life cycle. Students will spend time in community agencies to experience how clients are serviced.

3
FCS 450 Family Systems

Examines family functions, compositions, organizations, and families as they relate to cultures. Also includes alternative lifestyles that may be chosen by individuals. This course will also analyze the productive vs. disruptive characteristics of families.

3
FCS 452 Parentology

Parenting theories and outcomes studied and compared in the context of parent-child relationships. Also, various family forms and parenting styles will be studied.

3
FCS 499 Independent Study

Involves student initiated, faculty directed study and research in accordance with the University and departmental guidelines. Requires approval of chairperson.

Requires approval of chairperson.

3
N D 101A,B Contemporary Nutrition Topics and Skills

Introduction to computer applications in nutrition and dietetics, the profession, portfolio development, professional conduct standards, and current topics and opportunities in nutrition. Divided into 101A Computer Applications and 101B Nutrition Topics.

1
N D 103/L Basic and Culinary Foods with Lab

Introduction to basic physical and chemical properties of foods. Acquisition of culinary and merchandising techniques and the evaluation of prepared products. Lab is required. Lab fee.

3
N D 112 Nutrition I

Studies the chemistry, digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients and discusses the interrelationship of nutrients. 

Suggested prior courses: BIOL 121, 122; CHEM 110, 210 or permission of the instructor.

3
N D 138 Food and Safety

Studies safe food handling principles and practices that are necessary to meet the requirements of the food service industry and regulatory agencies.

1
N D 203/L Food Science and Technology with Lab

Application of scientific principles and experimental procedures in food preparation. Lab is required. Lab fee. 

Suggested prior courses: CHEM 110, 210; N D 103 or permission of the instructor.

3
N D 211 Nutrition Education

Introduction to the nature and theories of learning, communication, and their application to the production/utilization of nutrition education for various audiences. 

Suggested prior course: N D 112.

3
N D 213 Nutrition II

A study of the physiological, biochemical, and sociological factors that affect nutrient requirements and recommendations over the life cycle. Emphasis on practical applications, including appropriate food selections to meet nutrient needs. 

Suggested prior course: N D 112.

3
N D 223/L Social and Cultural Aspects of Food with Lab

A study of foods and food customs of various regional, national, and ethnic groups. Experience in planning, marketing, and presenting cultural meals. Lab is required. Lab fee.  (global)

Suggested prior courses: N D 103/L

3
N D 300 Theory of Medical Nutrition Therapy I

Study of the profession and practice of nutrition and dietetics, including the roles of dietitians and other health team members in patient/client care and the nutritional care process. Classroom and simulated experience in nutritional assessment, planning, implementing nutritional care, counseling, and documenting in medical records will be completed.

Suggested prior courses: N D 112 and N D 213.

3
N D 301A,B,C Theory of Food Systems Management I

Introduces the systems approach to management. Emphasizes management theory and functions, quantity food production, and marketing. Divided into 301A Management, 301B Quantity Food Production, and 301C Marketing. Coordinated with N D 391.

4.5
N D 309 Principles of Quantity Food Production and Service

Involves quantity food production and service, menu planning, standardization of recipes, and use and care of equipment. Lab fee.

 Suggested prior course: N D 103/L.

3
N D 312 Community Nutrition

Introduction to the principles of public health and community nutrition. Involves the study of the local, state, and federal resources and legislation for the delivery of health care and the provision of food and nutrients to all stages of the life cycle. 

Suggested prior courses: N D 112, 211 and 213. Coordinated with N D 392.

2
N D 322 A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H Interprofessional Medical Missions

This course offers an interprofessional approach to clinical screenings and assessments, client education, and health related service in communities in underdeveloped or developing countries. Additionally, this course offers exposure to the cultures of communities in underdeveloped or developing countries and will enhance the students’ cultural competence. Requires participation in a Medical Mission in an under developed/developing country. 

Suggested prior courses: N D: 112, 138, 211, 213, 223, 300, and 312. Permission from the instructor required.

3
N D 331 Sports Nutrition

A course which studies how exercise affects nutrient use and need, as well as the health benefits of exercise, diet, and cardiovascular wellness. Emphasis is placed on lifestyle change and personal responsibility in improving wellness. 

Suggested prior course N D 112.

3
N D 379A,B,C,D Food Systems Management II

Involves classroom experience in human relations, purchasing, food cost control and financial management, computer applications, and layout and equipment. Divided into 379A Human Relations, 379B Purchasing, 379C Cost Control and Financial Management, and 379D Layout and Equipment. 

Suggested prior courses: N D 138, 301A, B, C or 309.

6
N D 391 Supervised Practice Food Systems Management I

Develops practitioner skills and application in management theory and functions, marketing, and quantity food production. Coordinated with N D 301. Lab fee.

1
N D 392 Supervised Practice Community Nutrition

Observation and participation in local community agencies. Involves coordinated didactic and supervised practice experiences. Coordinated with N D 312. Lab fee.

1.5
N D 400 Preparation for Professional Practice

This course involves analysis and review of all nutrition-related didactic material. It also involves the exploration of future professional goals, preparation for the application process to internship experiences, and preparation for professional experiences in the field of nutrition and dietetics. This is the capstone course for the DPD.

3
N D 415A,B,C,D Chemistry, Cuisine, and Culture

Studies the wine and cuisine of various European countries. Spring break trip abroad to country.

Must apply for approval with the Office of International and Multicultural Affairs. Permission from the instructor is required.

3
N D 420 Theory of Medical Nutrition Therapy II

Studies the biochemical and pathophysiological basis for medical and dietary treatments of diseases. 

Suggested prior courses: N D 112, 213, and 300.

6
N D 465 Research in Nutrition and Dietetics

An introductory research course with emphasis on applications within the area of nutrition and dietetics. Includes overview of research concepts, research design for both quantitative and qualitative studies, data collection strategies, interpretation of results, and outcome assessment. Incorporates critiques of current literature to help prepare students to be critical consumers of research.

3
N D 499 Independent Study

Involves student-initiated, faculty-directed study and research in accordance with University and departmental guidelines. 

Requires approval of chairperson.

1-3
N D 500 Professional Practice in Dietetics/Staff Relief Course includes the Dietetic Internship's Staff Relief Experience and the program's final exam, along with review of the CDR's domains for the registration examination. Prerequisite: admission to the DI. 2
N D 501 Recent Trends in Medical Nutrition Therapy Study of recent advances and trends in medical literature which impact on the relationship of diet and nutrition to disease. Includes application of research, using case studies which involve integration of pathophysiology in disease with use of therapeutic diets. 3
N D 502 Exercise Testing and Nutritional Assessment

A review of techniques/procedures used during exercise testing and nutritional assessments. The course will include lectures in the classroom and demonstrations in the Human Physiology Lab, where students will correctly calibrate and use the lab equipment to assess the physical and nutritional status of clients.

3
N D 503 Endocrine Disorders, Nutrition, and Exercise

Study of recent developments in the dietary treatment of endocrine disorders, including mechanisms of action, interpretation of lab tests, pathophysiology of organ systems, and appropriate therapies  with their application to nutrition and exercise

3
N D 504 Nutrition and Gerontology A study of physiological and biochemical changes of aging persons, nutrition requirements, and dietary management of the geriatric patient with special emphasis on nutrition management of individuals in a long-term care setting. 3
N D 505 Maternal and Child Nutrition Nutritional needs during pregnancy and lactation for the normal growth and development of the fetus and infant. Dietary requirements postnatally for growth and development from infancy through the adolescent years. 3
N D 506 Nutrition and Human Behavior An examination of the effects of diet on human behavior. Special emphasis on nutrition and central nervous system function including effects of diet on neurotransmitter synthesis. 3
N D 507 International Nutrition An examination of the world food situation: analysis of current problems with presentation of possible solutions for both developed and developing nations. 3
N D 509 Principles of Strength and Conditioning This course will provide an introduction to basic concepts of strength and conditioning, including the physiological adaptations to strength training, the design of appropriate strength and conditioning programs, and proper lifting and spotting techniques. Classroom lectures will focus on the current body of knowledge within the field and will be complemented by experiences in the weight room. 3
N D 510 Biomechanics

This course provides the application of mechanical concepts to movement problems in sport, rehabilitation, and fitness. Anatomical and mechanical principles that effect human movement will be addressed.

3
N D 511 Environmental Nutrition An examination of testing technology for evaluating the safety of substances applied to, or included in, foods; food-borne illness; toxicants occurring naturally in foods; pesticide contamination of food; toxicology of food additives and various commercial food processing technologies. 3
N D 513 Exercise and Aging An analysis of the role of exercise and nutrition in the aging process. Course will include specific recommendations for healthy aging and the role of exercise in relations to various health conditions. 3
N D 520 Recent Trends in Normal Nutrition A review of the medical literature and research pertaining to normal nutrition throughout the life cycle. Exploration of the relationship between food and health. 3
N D 523 Immunology, Nutrition, and Exercise

Examination of the interrelationships between diet, exercise, and immune function. Review of current scientific literature as it applies to nutritional and physical activity impact on the immune system.

3
N D 525 Clinical Nutrition: Pharmacology and Fluid-Electrolyte Balance Basic concepts of pharmacology with special emphasis on drug and nutrient interactions. Maintenance of cell homeostasis through the interaction of water and electrolytes. 3
N D 530 Health Promotion An overview of current health promotion/wellness techniques and programs designed to facilitate behavioral change. Emphasis on review of current scientific literature concerning the development, implementation, and evaluation of health promotion programming. 3
N D 534 Private Practice in Nutrition, Exercise Science, and Health Promotion

An examination of the various areas required to establish and maintain a successful private practice in nutrition, exercise, and health promotion.

3
N D 536 Communication Techniques in Nutrition and Exercise Importance of modern and effective communication skills in management, teaching, and directing of students, clients, and employees. Special focus on the needs of the adult learner. 3
N D 541 Nutrition and Women's Health

The study of nutrition issues affecting women's health; focuses on normal and preventative nutrition and chronic diseases.

3
N D 549 Sports Nutrition The interrelationships between physical fitness, athletic performance, nutrient intake, and nutritional status. Dietary recommendations for enhancement of human performance. 3
N D 560 Biochemistry of Nutrition and Exercise Biochemical and physiological basis of nutrition at the cellular and organelle levels. Chemistry of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, nucleic acids, and enzymes with special focus on metabolic interrelationships and their effects on exercise. 3
N D 565 Supervised Practice: Community Nutrition In-depth experiential course emphasizing various public and private resources for the delivery of nutrition education information to all stages of the life cycle. Prerequisite: admission to DI. 6
N D 566 Supervised Practice: Food Systems Management In-depth experiential course emphasizing management theory and functions. Includes quantity food ordering, receiving, inventory, storage and production, tray assembly and delivery, equipment cleaning and maintenance, non-patient food services, manpower and scheduling, regulatory compliance, policies and procedures, labor management and training, and financial management. Prerequisite: admission to the DI. 6
N D 568 Supervised Practice: Clinical Dietetics

In-depth experiential course emphasizing nutrition care services in acute and long-term care facilities. Includes the roles of dietitians in patient care, practitioner skills in patient/client interviewing, and therapeutic approaches in treating disease.

Prerequisite: admission to the DI.

6
N D 572 Sports Psychology Introduction of psychological concepts relevant to competitive and recreational athletes. Topics will include motivation, aggression, skill acquisition and development of confidence. Special attention will be paid to those psychological techniques to speed recovery from injury and interventions to enhance performance. 3
N D 574 Exercise Physiology Examination of physiological concepts related to exercise. Analysis of scientific basis underlying the relationship of metabolism, environmental stress, and body composition to optimal human performance. 3
N D 575 Nutrition and Exercise for Weight Management Analysis of theories of eating behavior and weight control. Evaluation of various weight reduction and maintenance modalities. Special focus on the development and use of scientifically-based diet/weight control programs. 3
N D 578 Sports Supplements An in-depth examination of dietary supplements used by athletes to enhance performance. Course will focus on evaluating current scientific literature, bridging the gap between laboratory findings and real-world athletics, and establishing recommendations for sport. 3
N D 581 The Energy Nutrients and Alcohol Review of literature on carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and alcohol chemistry, digestion, absorption, and utilization. Examination of current issues involving energy nutrients and alcohol. 3
N D 582 Vitamins and Minerals Physiological basis of the utilization of vitamins and minerals. Review of current scientific literature. 3
N D 590 Research Methodology

Introduction to methodology, design, and statistical applications in health science research. This course is intended to make the student a more informed consumer of the nutrition/dietetics research literature and to provide sufficient information for the design of a theoretically and methodologically sound study.

3
N D 591 Statistical Analysis Application of statistics to data analysis and use of SPSS. 3
N D 595 A, B, C Research Thesis The practical application of research design and statistical analysis related to the field of foods and nutrition. An individually-directed, in-depth research project. Prerequisite or corequisite: approved research course and prior topic approval by department faculty. 1, 1, 1
N D 596 Capstone Experience

Latest research on specific topics of present interest is synthesized, presented, and discussed. Course requires independent work and active participation in class discussions.

3
N D 599 Independent Study A course or project designed to meet an individual student's interests and needs through primarily self-directed learning. Permission of chairperson is necessary prior to enrollment. 3