English and Foreign Languages Courses

Code Course Name Description Credits
ENGL 160 Composition and Rhetoric

Course lays strong foundations for college-level argumentative and inquiry-based writing by increasing rhetorical awareness, analytical skills, and research proficiency. Through guided practice with process-based academic writing, students produce original arguments that employ research to engage in ongoing academic conversations. Minimum grade of “C” required.

3
ENGL 170 Introduction to Literary Studies

Introduction to the discipline of English and the practices of literary and writing studies, including (but not limited to) close reading, research in the discipline, principles of literacy and rhetorical analysis, conventions of various genres of literature and writing, and genre formation, as well as approaches to writing about literature. 

Prerequisite: ENGL 160.  Required for English: Literature and English: Writing majors.

3
ENGL 180 Introduction to World Literature

Course surveys western and non-western literature of the world. Students will read texts in several genres. Course content will vary by instructor.

Prerequisite: ENGL 160.

3
ENGL 310 Short Story

Course provides a study of the art of short story writers through in-depth examination of the elements of fiction: plot, character, setting, style, point of view, and theme.

3
ENGL 311 Satire

Provides in-depth study of a genre popular since classical times, covering a wide range of authors and satiric topics. Emphasizes an understanding of the nature of satire and an appreciation of the techniques employed by skilled satirists.

3
ENGL 312 Poetry

Course explores definitions of poetry and ways to enjoy, think about, and write about poetry, with attention to literary elements and the ways these contribute to a poem’s meaning and effect.

3
ENGL 314 Mythology

Approaches the topic of mythology by way of universal themes and investigates the connections between ancient myths and the myths of contemporary cultures in a fascinating variety of literature.

3
ENGL 318 Women Writers

This course will introduce students to the unique voices of women who have adopted feminist principles in their lives and their writing. Students will develop a critical awareness of the historical, cultural and social contexts that shape women’s presence as writers, characters, and critics in literary and cultural studies.

3
ENGL 320 The Novella

Course investigates the characteristics of the short novel by reading several representative works of the genre.

3
ENGL 321 The Essay as Literature

Course investigates the methods and techniques of several types of nonfiction: autobiography, personal and narrative essay, history, literary journalism, political humor, and the nonfiction novel.

3
ENGL 323 Literary Criticism and Theory

This course examines the history, theory, and practice of literary criticism. Beginning with a study of classical sources, the course investigates how thinkers at various times have defined reading, writing, and the “literary” to analyze and evaluate texts. Much of the course is dedicated to twentieth-century literary theory, including psychoanalysis, Marxism, feminism, new criticism, reader-response, structuralism, deconstruction, new historicism, and post-colonial criticism.

3
ENGL 326 Feminist Culture Criticism

Students will read and respond to foundational feminist texts from first wave, second wave, and third wave feminisms, and they will ultimately apply these ideas by analyzing pop culture and investigating current gender issues in their major field of study. 

3
ENGL 331A Literature and Medicine

Studies selections from modern and contemporary world literature to examine universal concerns of health, illness, and healing as they are situated in a culture. The readings will foreground issues of illness, treatment, and healing from the perspectives of medical practitioners, patients, caregivers, family, and others.

3
ENGL 332 Mid and Far East Literature

This course surveys the literatures of the Mid and Far East, from Buddha to Chairman Mao, with emphasis on China, Japan, and India. Attempts to broaden the student’s worldview through literature and culture.

3
ENGL 334A Medieval Tolkien

Students will read a range of Anglo-Saxon and medieval texts that J.R.R. Tolkien translated, taught, edited, or studied in scholarly essays, and the use those texts as a lens to read critically Tolkien’s The Hobbit, Lord of the Rings, and other selections.

3
ENGL 336 Introduction to Film Criticism and Theory

Course enables students to acquire a critical awareness of how films work by studying a variety of techniques and theories; students will also analyze film classics, submit critiques of recent films, and read scholarship on film theory.

3
ENGL 336A International Film

Students will learn film theory and vocabulary in order to analyze contemporary films from around the world in terms of content, form, and cultural context.

3
ENGL 337 Mystical Writers

Course explores selections from the poetry, essays, and fiction of mystical writers. Aims at generating an understanding of the metaphysical philosophy of each writer.

3
ENGL 337A Contemporary Fantasy Literature

This course explores the genre of fantasy literature, considering the literary merits, rhetorical strategies, and stylistic features of novels and short stories written in recent years, as well as the ways these works comment on social and cultural issues in our world.

3
ENGL 339 Children's Literature

Surveys children’s literature from classical fables and fairy tales through the modern era. Class discussions will focus especially on the writings of British and American authors, past and present.

3
ENGL 339A Young Adult Literature

Course investigates the development of this unique genre and devotes significant attention to very recent titles. Explores questions of audience, censorship, form, identity, and social issues.

3
ENGL 341 Native Americans in Literature

Treats the experiences of Native American people of North America as they are revealed in literary works.

3
ENGL 342 History of Postmodern Women: Literature and Art

Surveys the history of art and literature produced by women since the feminist movement of the 1970s. Works explore representative themes of historical, cultural, and political developments associated with the movement. May fulfill either English or Art History requirements. Students must register accordingly.

Interdisciplinary

3
ENGL 347 African American in Literature

This course will treat the experiences of African-American people in the United States as they are revealed in literary works.

3
ENGL 349 Nature Studies

The course surveys selected nature writings from the Western and Eastern worlds by past and contemporary writers of both genders. Poems, short stories, essays, and excerpts from journals, biographies, and novels are examined for their contributions to our understanding of nature, self, and spirit; inner places and outer spaces; and the uncultivated versus the civilized.

3
ENGL 350 American Short Fiction

Course provides a survey of American short fiction from the nineteenth through the early twenty-first century, with readings connected to literary periods and cultural contexts.

3
ENGL 354 The Contemporary American Novel

This course examines a variety of representative contemporary American novels.

3
ENGL 356 Rural Literature

Through reading major works in several genres, students will investigate the massive transformations in rural America during the last century and a half. The course studies how rural-based texts respond to issues of race, class, gender, and the environment—issues central to any definition of America.

3
ENGL 358 Contemporary American Poetry

Immersion in the significant poets shaping American poetry from the 1970s to the present. Included will be major American poets as well as emerging poets. Some references to poets whose work informs American poetry but who are not American will also be included.

3
ENGL 360A Early Modern British Women Writers

Students will study the literary and rhetorical strategies of women writers from the fourteenth through seventeenth centuries by examining primary texts in several different genres, including drama, poetry, letters, diaries, pamphlets, petitions, religious tracts, and other forms of prose, as well as reading contemporary scholarship on these women.

3
ENGL 362 British Victorian Writers

Course explores the work of major literary figures of the Victorian age in relation to one another and to the history and ideologies of their times. Studies representative texts from a range of genres: poetry, drama, the essay, the short story, and the novel.

3
ENGL 362A Victorian Women Writers

The Victorian era was a time of sweeping change and intense debate with regard to women’s roles, opportunities, and participation in literary culture. This course explores some of the ways that Victorian women negotiated what was dubbed “the woman question,” particularly in relation to domesticity, education, creativity, marriage, sexuality, and identity. It examines texts by canonical writers (such as Browning, Eliot, and Gaskell), but gives particular attention to once-popular writers who are less well-known today.

3
ENGL 363 Modern British Novel

Course investigates the themes and styles of representative authors of modern British fiction.

3
ENGL 365A Early English Drama

Course surveys early English drama from the medieval mystery, morality, and folk plays and ritual dance to the early Tudor comedies and interludes to Renaissance drama of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

3
ENGL 367 British and American Poets

An upper-division study of poetry resulting in the ability to understand, explicate, and appreciate representative samples taken from British and American sources.

3
ENGL 368A Early Modern Poetry

Course asks students to explore a broad range of early modern poetry, which may include lyric poems, sonnets, epic, satire, or dramatic verse. Students will consider work within the literary, historical, and cultural contexts of the period, considering issues of patronage, methods of circulation, revision, and early modern literary theory.

3
ENGL 369 The Nineteenth-Century British Novel

Course investigates the development of the British novel over the nineteenth century and examines how representative texts reflected and shaped their historical and cultural contexts.

3
ENGL 370 Shakespeare

Provides an in-depth study of Shakespeare’s most enduring and representative tragedies, comedies, and histories. Provides an in-depth study of the human condition as Shakespeare sees it as well as a thorough investigation of his view of language.

3
ENGL 371 Faulkner and Hemingway

Presents selected short stories and novels by each author in order to familiarize the student with each of these outstanding modern American writers. Closely examines individual style and recurring themes. Typically fulfills the American literature requirement.

3
ENGL 376 Poe and Twain

Studies the major works of two profound influences in American literature. Typically fulfills the American literature requirement.

3
ENGL 378 Plath, Sexton, and Company

Course focuses on two women writers who influenced and changed the way women express themselves. Some topics: the Confessional company, suicide, sexuality, and women’s issues. Typically fulfills the American literature requirement.

3
ENGL 381 Chaucer

This course will examine in depth some of Chaucer’s major works, including The Canterbury Tales, as well as a selection of his shorter poetry. In order to appreciate the full meaning of Chaucer’s words, we will read the texts in the original language, but a prior knowledge of Middle English is not required. Typically fulfills the British literature requirement.

3
ENGL 399 Special Topics

An in-depth exploration of a specific author, genre, theme, literary period, or rhetorical mode not regularly offered.

3
ENGL 400 Structure of Linguistics

Designed for students in communications, English, education, and related areas who require a sense of the historical development of the English language. Introduces the major grammar systems (traditional, structural, and transformational); reviews classical diagramming; explores theories of language acquisition; and considers the social and cultural dimensions of language use.

3
ENGL 412A Teaching Writing

This course offers students the opportunity to learn how to teach written composition. Provides students guidance in the creation of appropriate lesson plans and grading techniques. Instruction in teaching grammar is also included. 

Required of all English majors in the secondary education program; must be taken before student teaching.

3
ENGL 412B Teaching Literature

This course offers students the opportunity to learn how to teach literature to high school students. Investigates test-making, grading the theme, lesson planning, disciplines, and other units. 

Required of all English majors in the secondary education program; must be taken before student teaching.

3
ENGL 420 Editing and Style

Students are required to learn and apply theories and strategies of editing and style that can improve academic writing, technical writing, web-based writing, business writing, and news writing. The class will also focus on conventions of grammar, mechanics, usage, and style sheets in various genres.

3
ENGL 425 Rhetoric and Persuasion

Students will study the history of rhetoric to learn classical principles of argumentation and explore various forms of persuasive writing to learn to recognize and analyze persuasive techniques while considering the various audiences of each work. Students will also learn to practice these techniques in their own writing.

3
ENGL 450 Writing for the Social Sciences

This course helps the student write clearly and effectively about issues, problems, and questions that interest social scientists. The course assumes that the student has background knowledge of at least one social science, but the focus of the course is on broad principles of writing: selecting and focusing a topic, accommodating writing to particular audiences, organizing information and developing a range of styles appropriate to various audiences, and rhetorical situations. Assignments include: position paper, letter of inquiry, interview, translation, evaluation, pamphlet, abstract, and annotated bibliography. Workplace writing.

3
ENGL 451 Internship

Offers students on-the-job training under the supervision of qualified professionals at cooperating institutions and organizations. 

Requires 45 hours per academic credit.

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ENGL 460 Creative Writing

Students gain experience writing, critiquing, revising, and sharing both poetry and short fiction. Creative writing.

3
ENGL 461 Writing Creative Nonfiction

Students will examine the field of creative nonfiction, reading representative examples of the genre and analyzing the different techniques. They will also produce a portfolio of creative nonfiction writing, all of which will be revised and honed through class workshops. Creative writing.

3
ENGL 464 Writing Poetry

Students will study the craft of writing poetry by reading a variety of traditional and contemporary works and then experiment with poetic devices and forms, producing a portfolio of original creative works of their own which they will discuss in class workshops. Creative writing.

3
ENGL 470 Business and Technical Writing

The course offers practice in writing documents common to business and technical fields, including such documents as memos, letters, technical descriptions, proposals, reports, and the like. Emphasis is on content, form, and style. Workplace writing.

3
ENGL 475 Composition: Theory and Practice

Focuses on various theories that have informed the growing field of composition studies and provides students with opportunities to apply their ideas. Writing theory.

3
ENGL 480 Advanced Writing

Refines students’ abilities to write persuasive arguments for particular rhetorical contexts. The course focuses on strategies of research, invention, arrangement, and style.

3
ENGL 484 Political Writing and Rhetoric

Students will study political writing focusing primarily on current presidential, congressional, and/or gubernatorial elections. Using speeches, debate transcripts, websites, advertising, and other examples of candidates’ rhetoric, as well as political writing and rhetorical treatises from throughout history, students will learn to analyze and employ techniques of persuasive writing. The course is writing intensive and emphasizes oral presentations and discussion. Activist writing, writing theory, workplace writing.

3
ENGL 485 Writing and Cultural Studies

Focuses on developing writing abilities while critically examining the cultural communities to which we belong, especially in terms of popular culture, power dynamics, and issues of social justice. The cultural texts students will analyze through writing include various parts of everyday life, such as cars, celebrities, and coffee shops. Activist writing.

3
ENGL 490 Feminist Writing and Rhetoric

Course explores the nature of feminist writing through reading and writing assignments. Course will focus on feminist revisions of well-known texts, practical documents that work for political or social change, and the implications of traditional writing conventions. Activist writing, writing theory.

3
ENGL 495 Senior Seminar

Students will consider issues related to the discipline while building on research and critical thinking skills as they pursue an individual research project that culminates in a seminar paper. The course emphasizes drafting, the writing process, critical thinking, research methods, and oral presentations. 

It is required of all English majors.

3
ENGL 499 Independent Study

See the chairperson for details of Independent Study and differentially scheduled courses.

3
FREN 101, 102 Elementary French I, II

Emphasizes the acquisition of communication skills within a culturally significant context. Course planned specifically for the student who has not studied the language previously.

3
FREN 211, 212 Intermediate French I, II

Designed for students with two to three years of high school French or equivalent. Emphasizes the acquisition of communicative skills within a culturally significant context. Reviews the basics of French grammar. Uses readings to give an understanding of French and Francophone culture and lifestyles. Provides opportunities for practice in conversation.

3
FREN 221, 222 French Language and Culture I, II

Designed to provide insight into the cultural values of the French-speaking world. Explores the social, cultural, political, and economic traditions of French-speaking countries in a format that provides opportunity for conversational practice.

3
ITAL 101, 102 Elementary Italian I, II

Designed to enable students with no prior study of Italian to develop the communicative skills of understanding, reading, writing, and speaking Italian. Presents fundamentals of pronunciation, basic grammatical structures, readings and cultural assignments.

3
LANG 101, 102 English as a Second Language I, II

Designed to develop English language skills needed for college, including reading, writing, library usage, and research skills.

3
LANG 411B Curriculum Methods for Modern Foreign Languages K-12

Methods and Materials for Foreign Languages K-12. 

Integrates the theory and practice of teaching. Topics include classroom management, planning, techniques and strategies, evaluation, reading in the content area, and instructional materials and technology. 

 Prerequisite: upper level screening approval.

3
SPAN 101, 102 Elementary Spanish I, II

Designed to enable students with no prior study of Spanish to develop the communicative skills of understanding, reading, writing, and speaking Spanish. Presents fundamentals of pronunciation, basic grammatical structures, readings and cultural assignments.

3
SPAN 103, 104 Advanced Elementary Spanish I, II

Designed for students with one to two years of high school Spanish or equivalent. (Exceptions must have written approval from foreign languages chair.) Reviews pronunciation and grammar beginning with an intensive review of present tense and basic thematic vocabulary. Attention also given to the development of writing skills and reading comprehension within a cultural framework.

3
SPAN 211, 212 Intermediate Spanish I, II

Designed for students with three years of high school Spanish or equivalent. Emphasizes the acquisition of communicative skills within a culturally significant context. Reviews the basics of Spanish grammar. Uses readings to give an understanding of Spanish and Spanish-American culture and lifestyles. Provides opportunities for practice in conversation.

3
SPAN 223 Spanish for Reading and Review

Designed for students with four years of high school Spanish or equivalent. Emphasizes reading and writing strategies so that students may continue studying Spanish at the advanced level. Fundamental grammar structures will be reviewed in the context of reading. Conversational practice through class discussions and oral presentations.

3
SPAN 275 Conversational Spanish

Follow up course for Spanish 223. Seeks primarily to increase the level of student communication skills in Spanish. Designed to stimulate the spontaneous use of spoken Spanish.

3
SPAN 280 Contemporary Cultural Trends in Spanish-Speaking Films

Explores the culture, social issues, art, and ideologies of Spanish-speaking countries through award winning films. Promotes further development of conversational as well as critical thinking skills in Spanish. All films discussed have been created by Spanish and Hispanic directors, and all will be shown in the original language.

3
SPAN 290 Visions of Spain Through Art and Architecture

Traces the historical, political, religious, and artistic past of Spain through the works of master artists such as El Greco, Velásquez, Goya, Picasso, Dalí, Unamuno, García Lorca, and Buñuel among others.

3
SPAN 300 Intensive Grammar Review

A review and in-depth study of the most common issues in Spanish grammar: ser and estar, por and para, subjunctive, imperfect and preterit, pronouns, etc. Written and oral reinforcement exercises will complement this active learning course.

3
SPAN 302, 303 Introduction to Hispanic Literature I, II

An introductory course treating major works in fiction, poetry, and drama from Spain and Latin America: involves the study of primary historical, artistic, and literary currents, with readings and analysis of each point.

3
SPAN 304 Hispanic Short Story

Offers students the opportunity to improve their communication skills through the study of short fiction from Spain and Latin America. Highlights the Spanish generation of 98, Hispanic women writers, as well as authors associated with Magical Realism.

3
SPAN 306 Spanish for Professionals

Designed for students whose major is a service related field and who are nearing completion of the Spanish for the Professional minor. The course focuses on essential elements of Hispanic culture and values to reinforce students’ comprehension of and respect for people of different Hispanic backgrounds with whom they will work. Topics such as geography, ethnicity and race, gender roles, the family, the role of religion, current economic status and emerging opportunities for Spanish-speakers will be considered. Throughout the semester students will work independently on a culminating project directly related to their fields.

3
SPAN 307 Medical Spanish

Designed for students with majors in health related fields including nurses, dieticians, physicians and physician assistants. The course offers a review of Spanish pronunciation and grammar in the context of specialized professional vocabulary. Attention given to conversational role-play, written expression, and issues of cultural sensitivity. Prerequisite: SPAN 223 or by permission of Foreign Language Department.

3
SPAN 310 Contemporary Hispanic Issues

Offers an in-depth look at the recent trends, issues, and changes in the Spanish-speaking world, related to such areas as culture, business, education, politics, and history.

3
SPAN 321 Literature of the Golden Age

Focuses on sixteenth and seventeenth century Spanish authors, with reading and analysis of works by Garcilaso de la Vega, Cervantes, Calderón de la Barca, and Lope de Vega among others.

3
SPAN 325 Latin American Culture and Civilization

A study of the political, historical, economic, and cultural development of Latin America from the pre-Columbian civilizations to the present.

3
SPAN 326 Latino Writers in the U.S.

This course offers extensive study of some of the most important works written by Latino authors in the United States. Through the study of works by authors such as Esmeralda Santiago, Sandra Cisneros, Cristina García, Gustavo Pérez Firmat, Julia Alvarez, Rudolfo Anaya, Roberto Fernández, and Luis Valdez among others students will explore the cultural, social, historical, and political realities related to the Hispanic immigrant experience and the current realities of Latinos living in the U.S. Prerequisite: SPAN 223 or above.

3
SPAN 328 The History of Latinos in the United States

This course examines the experience of Latino immigrants in the United States by considering how “Spanish,” “Hispanics,” “Latinos,” etc. have adjusted, integrated, assimilated, resisted, and adapted to the many forces that affect their lives in the U.S., while creating new ethnic, racial, and local identities in the process. By studying the experience of Latino immigrants with a focus toward patterns of second class citizenship, identity formation, ethnic culture, community maturation, labor struggles, and social mobility, the course maps out a heterogeneous mosaic of Latin American and Caribbean diasporas in the U.S.

3
SPAN 329 Latino Popular Culture and the Arts

This course introduces students to popular Latino culture and art and prepares them to critically analyze areas of popular Latino culture including: music, film, television, performance, sports, media, art, food, and varied subcultures. Key topics include the relationship of contemporary Latino artists to the mainstream art world; debates about visual art as a vehicle for the expression of cultural identity; the role of gender, sexuality, class, and ethnicity in creative expression; the diversity of the Latino community; and an examination of “Latinidad” as an affirmative cultural construction for people of Latin American descent in the United States. The course concentrates mainly on the period of the early 60s, with special emphasis on the contemporary times.

3
SPAN 330 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation

Reviews advanced grammatical structures as well as proper use of written accents, pronunciation, and intonation, with special emphasis on the finer points of composition and idiomatic forms.

3
SPAN 332 Hispanic Literature of Social Protest

Focuses on Hispanic writers of fiction, poetry, essay and drama who have used their writings to challenge the cultural, social, and political realities of the day. Includes written and oral reports and readings of authors such as Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Ernesto Cardenal, Oscar Romero, Federico García Lorca, and Rigoberto Menchú.

3
SPAN 333 Spanish Culture and Civilization

A study of the political, historical, economic, social, and cultural development of Spain throughout the centuries.

3
SPAN 337 Commercial Spanish

Designed for International Business Majors and related fields. Highlights professional business vocabulary, correspondence, and issues of cultural sensitivity when doing business in the Hispanic world.

3
SPAN 340 Hispanic Women Writers

This course provides students the opportunity to read and analyze various genres of literature written by Hispanic women from the Middle Ages to today. Narrative, poetic and theatrical texts are read along with critical essays treating the topic of women’s writing with the goal of tracing the development of the female voice in Hispanic literature. The works of writers such as Santa Teresa de Jesús, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Rosalía de Castro, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Maria Luisa Bombal, Rosario Castellanos, Luisa Valenzuela, Julia Alvarez, and Isabel Allende among others are considered.

3
SPAN 350 The Latino Condition in the U.S.

A study of the main issues that concern the Spanish-speaking populations living in the United States. Investigates how bilingual and bicultural identities are shaped, how Latinos are represented in the media, the problems with borders and immigration, Chicano literature, “Spanglish,” bilingualism in the U.S., gender issues, and the question of assimilation. Methodologically speaking, this course will use case studies, a problem-based approach, and the promotion of analytical and critical skills.

3
SPAN 399 Special Topics

An in-depth exploration of a specific author, genre, theme, literary period, or rhetorical mode not regularly studied.

3
SPAN 410 Spanish Culture Through the Works of Federico García Lorca

This course provides students the opportunity to read and analyze essays, poems, and dramatic works written by Federico García Lorca as a means of exploring various fundamental aspects of Spanish history and culture. Among the key topics considered are: the social and artistic environment that inspired the artistry of Spain’s famed Generation of 1927, flamenco music and dance, Gypsy life in Andalusian Spain, the tradition of the bullfight, gender roles, and the Spanish Civil War.

3
SPAN 421 Modern Spanish Novel

Involves extensive study of some of the most important novels of Spanish literature. Includes written and oral reports and covers authors such as Ana María Mature, Camilo Josè Cela, Carmen Martín Gaite, Ramón Sender, among others.

3
SPAN 423 The Latin American Novel

Involves extensive study of important novels of Latin American literature. Includes written and oral reports and covers authors such as Gabriel García Márquez, Isabel Allende, Juan Rulfo, Carlos Fuentes, among others.

3
SPAN 499 Independent Study in Spanish

Typically a student-generated course designed around a topic of special interest. Motivates students to perform independent research. Requires permission of the Chairperson of the Foreign Languages Department.

3