Psychology and Counseling Courses

Code Course Name Description Credits
COUN 504 Philosophical Foundations of Counseling and Psychotherapy Designed to provide the student with an understanding of the changing nature of the counseling profession throughout recent history. Specific attention directed toward an understanding of the professional orientation and historical antecedents of contemporary practice, as well as the varied roles and functions of professional counselors. 3
COUN 505 Career Development Introduction to the field of career counseling through examination of the theories of career choice and their influence upon entry into the world of work. Includes an experiential laboratory for designing and implementing career programs, with emphasis on decision-making and problem-solving strategies and life-work planning. 3
COUN 506 Career Development II A study of occupational opportunities and job analyses through field work and conferences with representatives from business, industry, and education. Occupational surveys are conducted, noting job requirements, nature of work, earnings, work environment, opportunities for advancement, and trends. Prerequisite: COUN 505. 3
COUN 507 Principles and Practices of Mental Health Counseling This course explores the issues of mental health service delivery in a mental health setting. The course will focus on knowledge of the principles and practices of ethical standards and codes of the counseling profession, as well as the role and function of the mental health counselor within a community agency setting. Students will be exposed to current professional issues within the field of counseling and psychology. 3
COUN 518 Applied Practice I Designed to provide the student with an initial exposure to counseling. Small supervisory group study of counseling problems, principally through analysis of case materials, taping and critiquing interviews, role playing, and demonstration of strategies by faculty. 3
COUN 521 The Role of the Counselor Consultant in the Elementary School Provides the counselor-trainee with the necessary theoretical and perceptual background for counseling and consulting in an elementary school. Presentation of a variety of viewpoints concerning the role and function of the counselor-consultant. 3
COUN 523 Applied Practice in Elementary School Counseling II Emphasis directed toward theory, technique, and practical application of learned skills. On-campus and field experience required. (Admission by permission of chairperson.) 3
COUN 524 A, B, C Internship in Elementary School Counseling Field work experience in an approved setting under the direction of the Counselor Education faculty and certified elementary school guidance personnel. (Admission by permission of chairperson.) A total of 3 credits is required. See Departmental Handbook and advisor for registration options. 1.5, 1.5, 3
COUN 525 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy The study of contemporary individual and group counseling theory in view of recent research developments and current trends in counseling and psychotherapy. Emphasis upon the relationship between theory and practice. Prerequisite: COUN 504 or equivalent. 3
COUN 530 Ethics and Professional Conduct in Counseling and Psychotherapy This course is designed to examine the moral implications of professional clinical practice and to familiarize students with the history and development of professional ethics and standards and their legal implications in the areas of counseling and psychotherapy. Students will be introduced to moral, legal, and ethical issues and current debates on such topics as: privileged communication, confidentiality, rights of clients, civil commitment, licensure, and mental health laws. Students will become familiar with ethical standards for counselors as formulated by state and national professional associations. 3
COUN 532 Multicultural Issues for Counseling Professionals This course explores the issues of mental health service delivery to culturally distinct clients. This course will focus on ethnicity, gender, and other salient personal characteristics, and the effects of these elements on the counseling process and outcome. Skill development will include a more flexible frame of reference for relating to and dealing with diverse clients and their cultural traditions, values, and styles. 3
COUN 538 Psychopharmacology An in-depth, systematic study of the properties and behavioral effects of psychoactive drugs. Emphasis on the appropriate role of the nonmedical professional in therapeutic programming involving drugs. 3
COUN 543 Group Process in Counseling Provides candidates with the opportunity for involvement and participation in group experience in which they will be able to utilize the resources of their peers and the influence of their opinions, judgments, and insights. 3
COUN 544 Counseling Techniques An experiential laboratory course designed to provide the counselor-in-training with a variety of strategies and techniques necessary for the effective counseling of individuals and groups. Prerequisites: COUN 504, 518, 525. 3
COUN 545 Applied Practice II in Secondary School Counseling Integrates all facets of the student's personal philosophy of counseling with theory, techniques and skills acquired throughout the counselor training program. Covers practical experiences such as role playing, audiotaping and videotaping, critiquing, and test interpretation. (Admission by permission of chairperson.) 6
COUN 546 Organization and Administration of Counseling Services Establishing and directing a counseling program. Special organizational and administrative problems in institutions of different types. 3
COUN 550 Directed Readings

A program of individually directed readings designed to meet the needs of the student. Offered as required.

1-3
COUN 552 A, B, C Internship in Secondary School Counseling Supervised work experiences in a secondary school under the direction of Counselor Education faculty and qualified school personnel. (Admission by permission of chairperson.) A total of 3 credits is required. See Departmental Handbook and advisor for registration options. 1.5, 1.5, 3
COUN 553 A, B, C, D Internship in Mental Health Counseling Field work in an approved institutional or agency setting under the direction of Counseling faculty and qualified on-site personnel. (Admission by permission of chairperson.) A total of 6 credits is required. See Departmental Handbook for registration options. 2, 2, 2, 4
COUN 561 Introduction to Psychological Testing Provides background in psychometric and measurement issues that are the basis for psychological testing (reliability, validity, structural analysis of tests, normative approaches). Introduction to various types of psychological tests (e.g., cognitive ability tests, achievement tests, personality tests, neuropsychological tests, career and interest tests, selection procedures). Covers ethical and legal issues related to psychological testing. Includes laboratory exposure to testing materials. 3
COUN 562 Assessment of Adult Personality and Psychopathology Principles and applications of structured assessment of adult personality and psychopathology. Integration of theory and practical application. Focus will be on objective measures of assessment, with some exposure to projective measures. Class will involve lecture, discussion, and practicum elements involving test-taking, scoring, and interpretation. 3
COUN 570 Contemporary Issues Seminar Investigation of causes, rationale, scope, and treatment of problems involving personal and social adjustment, including alcohol and drug abuse, sexual maladjustments and alternate behavior forms, problems of aging. Special topic areas not included in other course offerings may be targeted, e.g. neurolinguistic programming, hypnotherapy, forensic psychology, and crisis intervention. 3
COUN 572 Counselor Education Seminar - Elementary and Secondary A seminar course specific to elementary or secondary issues and concerns. Topics include school law, integration of counseling programs in secondary or elementary settings, and specific duties and responsibilities. This course is designed to provide students with a wide range of current trends in school counseling. 3
COUN 574 Family Counseling Planned to provide the counselor-in-training with an overview of the theories, techniques, and processes involved in family relationships. Prerequisite: COUN 525. 3
COUN 575 Counseling the Aging Provides the helping professional with specific counseling skills required for working with the aged. Also covers pertinent topics such as group work, organic brain syndrome, senility, etc. 3
COUN 576 Adult Development Course is directed toward an understanding of the major issues of development and the specific skills necessary for counseling adults. Focus upon mid-life crises, intimacy, age bias, and achievement patterns in adulthood. 3
COUN 577 Group Practicum Reviews leadership styles and group development. Required: facilitating a group under supervision. (Admission by permission of chairperson.) 3
COUN 581 Socio-emotional Assessment of Children and Adolescents Utilizes a comprehensive problem-solving and ecological model of assessment for children and adolescents. Geared toward the school mental health provider, this course focuses on the integration of psychological, behavioral, and family assessment information. Emphasis on the critical link between assessment and effective intervention. Prerequisite: PSY 561AND PSY 532 OR COUN 572. 3
COUN 582 Counseling the Abuser of Drugs and Alcohol Explores the current techniques utilized by the counseling profession in the treatment of the abuser of drugs and alcohol. An insight into the personal dynamics of this clientele. Prerequisite: PSY 514 and COUN 525 or PSY 517. 3
COUN 583 Human Sexuality Provides the counselor-in-training with fundamental knowledge about human sexuality and specific sexual concerns that contribute to the effectiveness of a counseling relationship. Focus on important sex-related ethics and issues in counseling. (Admission by permission of chairperson.) 3
COUN 584 Marital Counseling and Therapy Studies theoretical approaches to marital therapy, couple therapy, and marital group therapy; also describes therapeutic processes and techniques. Prerequisite: COUN 525 or equivalent. 3
COUN 586 Chemical Dependence An investigation of the dynamics of mood-altering chemical substance use, abuse, and dependence. 3
COUN 587 Counseling the Divorced and Separated Seminar dealing with issues in counseling divorced and separated individuals, including laws, child custody, step-parenting, single parenting, communication skills, etc. 3
COUN 588 Introduction to Pastoral Counseling: Foundation, Theory and Practice This course is designed as an introduction to pastoral counseling. Specific attention is directed at understanding the role and dimension of pastoral counseling and the unique aspects of pastoral counseling and ministry. Various theories are investigated as they impact on the history and practice of pastoral counseling. Ethics and ethical issues are explored in depth. 3
COUN 589 Seminar in Pastoral Counseling Assists the student with an understanding of various issues confronting the pastoral counselor. The interplay of morality, ethics, and client needs is explored in depth as a pastoral counselor is often called upon to assist individuals and families in acute issue oriented crises. Prerequisite: COUN 588. 3
PSY 501 Research Methods The purpose of this course is to present research methodologies and statistics in an integrated manner so that students may attain a comprehensive view of psychological research. A conceptual understanding of statistics will be emphasized while the mathematical aspects will be minimized. While the primary emphasis will be on experimental and correlational research designs, exploratory and descriptive techniques will also be considered. Recommended for students who plan to take only one Research/Statistics course. 3
PSY 503 Research Methods and Statistics I This is the first in a two-course sequence which presents research methods and statistical applications in the behavioral sciences. Emphasis on conceptual integration of statistical concepts as well as application and interpretation of data analyses. Development of critical analysis skills in hypothesis development, measurement tool assessment, operationalizing constructs, and analysis strategies. Primary emphasis on correlational and experimental research with some coverage of quasi-experimental and descriptive methods. 3
PSY 504 Research Methods and Statistics II This is the second in a two-course sequence which presents research methods and statistical applications in the behavioral sciences. Emphasis on conceptual integration of statistical concepts as well as application and interpretation of data analyses. Development of critical analysis skills in hypothesis development, measurement tool assessment, operationalizing constructs, and analysis strategies. Primary emphasis on correlational and experimental research with some coverage of quasi-experimental and descriptive methods. 3
PSY 508 Biological Bases of Behavior This course focuses on the structure and function of the nervous system, as well as the biological bases of perception, memory, language, and psychological disorders. Special emphasis is placed on the behavioral expression of dysfunction in these areas. 3
PSY 514 Human Development An examination of human development throughout the lifespan, with in-depth coverage of developmental theories and research methods. Critique of empirical studies required. Previous coursework in developmental psychology suggested. 3
PSY 517 Personality Psychology In-depth coverage of major theories of personality with an emphasis on psychodynamic, humanistic, behavioral, cognitive, trait and biologically-based theories. Examination of research-based theories that deal with specific aspects of human personality such as anxiety, aggression, self-concept. Critical evaluation of empirical support for theories and their applications in the human services. 3
PSY 518 Advanced Human Development A review of recent literature in the field of developmental psychology, including perception, cognition, social and personality development. Students will search and critique empirical studies in an area of interest, discuss empirical literature in a seminar format, analyze and synthesize research and theory. 3
PSY 521 Social Psychology Examines social influences on thought and behavior. Covers multicultural and crosscultural differences in social thought and behavior, interpersonal relationships and attraction, attitudes and behavior, prejudice, group dynamics, and the interaction between personality and social influences on behavior. Considers basic theories, research findings, and applications to improve social interactions. Includes reading, reviewing, and applying findings of original source journal articles along with text readings. 3
PSY 522 Cognitive/Affective Bases of Behavior Consideration of topics concerned with cognition and emotion. Includes attention, memory, learning, memory, reasoning and intelligence. 3
PSY 523 Contemporary Learning Theories An in-depth evaluation of contemporary learning theories, with emphasis on major issues, research findings, and application of learning principles to human functioning. 3
PSY 525 Industrial/Organizational Psychology Survey of theory, research, and practice of industrial/organizational psychology. Topics include diversity and multicultural issues in the workplace, personality and its relationship to personnel selection, retention, productivity, and job satisfaction, organizational structure and development, culture, intervention strategies, change management, power, motivation, leadership, quality of work life, group/team processes, employment law, recruitment techniques, and performance management. 3
PSY 526 Community Psychology Development of community psychology approach to mental health problems. Assessment of community needs and availability of treatment resources. Examination of innovative roles for psychologists in mental health systems such as crisis intervention, short-term therapy, program evaluation and consultation. 3
PSY 530 Ethics and Professional Conduct in Counseling and Psychology This course is designed to examine the moral implications of professional clinical practice and to familiarize students with the history and development of professional ethics and standards and their legal implications in the areas of counseling and psychotherapy. Students will be introduced to moral, legal, and ethical issues and current debates on such topics as: privileged communication, confidentiality, right of clients, civil commitment, licensure, and mental health laws. Student will become familiar with ethical standards for psychologists as formulated by state and national professional associations. 3
PSY 531 Psychopathology An in-depth examination of the range of emotional disorders. Emphasis is placed on major cognitive, affective, personality, and character disturbances in adults. Integration of the psychodynamic, behavioral, and cognitive perspectives. Etiology, research findings, intervention implication, and classification issues. 3
PSY 532 Child Psychopathology An examination of the behavioral disturbances common to childhood and adolescence, with stress on their etiology and on the roles of the family and school in the child's total functioning and therapeutic programming. Stresses distinction between child and adult adaptive criteria. Prerequisite: PSY 514. 3
PSY 538 Psychopharmacology An in-depth, systematic study of the properties and behavioral effects of psychoactive drugs. Emphasis on the appropriate role of the nonmedical professionals in therapeutic programming involving drugs. Previous coursework in physiological psychology preferred. 3
PSY 539 Behavior Management Approaches Explores principles of behavior analysis and modification. Provides competency in individual and group technology following a format that aims at facilitating development and implementation of behavior-change programs in applied settings. Design of intervention programs using a variety of strategies is required by class participants. 3
PSY 547 Introduction to School Psychology This course provides an overview of the contemporary field of school psychology. Emphasis is on learning the historical, contemporary, and future influences of the development of the field of school psychology. Students also gain exposure to the school system through practical experiences. 3
PSY 549 Field Work Experience-School Psychology
PSY 549A Practicum Campus-based experience in a supervised program designed to develop and apply the range of competencies of the school psychologist. 3 credit hours
PSY 549B Internship Further application and refinement of the school psychologist competencies in an approved, off-campus professional setting. (The total practicum and internship experience will be 9 graduate credits.) 6 credit hours
PSY 550 Directed Readings

A program of individually directed readings designed to meet the needs of the student.

1-3
PSY 551 School Psychology Law and Ethics This course covers legal and ethical foundations for the role of School Psychologist. Emphasis will be on exposing students to federal legislation, state regulations, pertinent court cases, and ethical principles of governing bodies, including the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) and the American Psychological Association (APA). 3
PSY 552 School-Based Consultation Methods This course covers the rationale, theory, and methods of various models of consultation. Students will develop competencies in consultation with teachers, parents, students/clients, and other program staff. These competencies include problem identification, problem analysis, treatment development and implementation, and evaluation of treatment outcomes. Consultation will be considered from the vantage point of organizational and systems level factors that impact on effectiveness of consultation in schools and mental health programs. 3
PSY 554 Master's Thesis Proposal Development of an acceptable master's thesis proposal. Involves mentoring experience by a faculty member and committee. Development of literature review, methodology, and hypothesis statement into an accepted proposal for master's thesis. Taken the semester prior to completion of PSY 556, Master's Thesis. 0-3 credits
PSY 555 Professional Contribution Involves mentoring experiences by a faculty member, leading to completion of an approved project, demonstration or other acceptable product of the student's professional competence. Course meets Professional Contribution requirement. 0
PSY 556 Master's Thesis Completion of an acceptable thesis involving a quantitative research design. Involves mentoring experience by a faculty member and committee. Recommended for students with doctoral degree aspirations. Meets Professional Contribution requirement. Prerequisite: successful completion of PSY 554 and accepted thesis proposal. 3
PSY 559 A, B Prepracticum This prepares students for the practicum experience in the Psychological Services Center (PSC). It is designed to extend for the entire year, and involves 48 hours of observation of screenings, intakes, therapy sessions, and assessment procedures. Shadowing a practicum student may also be involved to learn the policies and procedures of the PSC. Students engage in weekly group and/or individual supervision to help prepare them as clinicians in practicum. Variable Credit
PSY 560 Cognitive-Behavioral Assessment Techniques Identification and measurement of meaningful cognitive and behavioral responses for the purpose of assessment and devising change strategies. Examination of selfmonitoring, physiological measures, behavioral enactment, observer-based coding systems, n=1 assessment designs. Prerequisite: PSY 561. 3
PSY 561 Introduction to Psychological Testing Provides background in psychometric and measurement issues that are the basis for psychological testing (reliability, validity, structural analysis of tests, normative approaches). Introduction to various types of psychological tests (e.g., cognitive ability tests, achievement tests, personality tests, neuropsychological tests, career and interest tests, selection procedures). Covers multicultural, ethical, and legal issues related to psychological testing. Includes laboratory exposure to testing materials. 3
PSY 562 Cognitive Assessment Provides an overview of contemporary theories and methods of cognitive assessment. Students will develop skills in the assessment of pre-school and school age children, adolescents, and adults, using a variety of instruments including the Wechsler scales, the Stanford Binet, and the Woodcock Johnson Psycho Educational Test Battery. Prerequisite: PSY 561 or equivalent. 3
PSY 563 Assessment of Learning An investigation of assessment approaches used in the evaluation of learning styles and the cognitive, motor, and environmental factors influencing the learning process. Of special interest to school psychologists, counselors, and other multidisciplinary team professionals, this class also integrates the theoretical and practical issues associated with curriculum-based assessment. Prerequisite: PSY 561 or equivalent. 3
PSY 566 Contemporary Methods In Projective Personality Testing This course will teach the student how to administer, score, and interpret projective tests. A primary emphasis will be on the Rorschach, but coverage will also be given to the Thematic Apperception Test. Methods for integrating findings from projective and objective tests will be covered. Consideration of current empirical literature which both supports and challenges the use of projective testing In contemporary practice. Prerequisite: PSY 561; either PSY 531 or 531; either PSY 580 or 581. 3
PSY 569 Stress, Coping and the Self-Concept Provides direct experience in research, assessment, and treatment issues concerning stress, coping and the self-concept. Emphasis on in-depth consideration of cognitive and phenomenological theory and research. Students will gain experience with selfmonitoring, psychophysiological measures, questionnaire and experimental methods of assessment. Treatment focuses on cognitive, behavioral, and experimental strategies. Prerequisite: PSY 517 or permission of instructor. 3
PSY 571 Introduction to Individual Psychotherapy An examination of contemporary systems of therapy, with emphasis on major insight-oriented, behavioral, cognitive, and eclectic approaches. Role-playing, audiovisual aids, and other applications included. 3
PSY 572 Introduction to Group Psychotherapy An investigation of the theoretical assumptions, research support and applications of major group-oriented therapeutic modalities. Appropriate training aids integrated with instruction. Prerequisites: PSY 517, PSY 531, or admission through chairperson. 3
PSY 573 Therapy With Children An investigation of the rationale and utility of varied therapeutic strategies with concentration in play and expressive approaches. Case studies, tapes, demonstrations provided. Prerequisite: COUN 518 OR PSY 571. Recommended: PSY 532. 3
PSY 574 Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Investigation of behavioral and cognitive intervention strategies. Covers traditional behavioral therapies (e.g., token economy, systematic desensitization), cognitive behavioral therapies (modeling, stress inoculation training, Beck's cognitive therapy), and "third wave" approaches including mindfulness and psychotherapy integration. Training in the use of specific assessment and intervention strategies (tapes, demonstrations, pre-practicum experiences). Prerequisite: PSY 517 or 571. 3
PSY 575 Forensic Psychology Examines the nature of forensic evaluations, reports, and expert witness testimony and the professional and ethical responsibilities involved. Surveys the primary areas of law including family law, mental health law, criminal law, child abuse, juvenile law, and personal injury law. Covers evaluation and treatment of accused persons and working effectively with the criminal justice system. 3
PSY 576 Professional Seminar

Issues involving the expectations, role, and identity of the mental health professional. Topics included: relationship to other professionals, ethics, legal constraints and obligations, consultation, case conceptualization, and other current issues. Intended for the clinical services trainee.

1-3
PSY 577 Practicum I Required for students in clinical services tracks, this is an applied clinical experience that is designed to extend for the entire semester. Students will schedule at least four hours of activity per week. One hour a week will be spent doing pre-treatment assessments and psychotherapy; most of the time this will be with a client in the Psychological Services Center (PSC). Three hours a week will be spent in small group supervision. Additional individual supervision will be scheduled on an as needed basis. Students will be expected to complete 15 clinical contact hours. Other opportunities for learning may be added at the discretion of the course instructor. (Prerequisites: PSY 571 or COUN 518; PSY 531 or PSY 532; candidacy in clinical services or child clinical/school concentration.) Minimum grade of "B" required; if a student earns a grade lower than "B" this course will need to be repeated until the student earns a grade of "B". 3
PSY 578 Internship Supervised field work experience in an approved clinical setting. Available to students in the Clinical Services concentration. Requires permission of advisor and department chairperson. Meets Professional Contribution requirement. Prerequisite: PSY 577. variable credit
PSY 580 Assessment of Adult Personality and Psychopathology Principles and applications of structured assessment of adult personality and psychopathology. Integration of theory and practical application. Focus will be on objective measures of assessment, with some exposure to projective measures. Class will involve lecture, discussion, and practicum elements, involving test-taking, scoring and interpretation. Prerequisites: Psychology 561 and 531. 3
PSY 581 Socio-emotional Assessment of Children and Adolescents Utilizes a comprehensive problem-solving and ecological model of assessment for children and adolescents. Geared toward the child clinical and school mental health provider, this course focuses on the integration of psychological, behavioral, and family assessment information. Emphasis on the critical link between assessment and effective intervention. Prerequisites: PSYCHOLOGY 561 AND 532 OR COUN 572. 3
PSY 585 Family-School Interventions Exploration of the legal, ethical, and pragmatic issues associated with family-school collaboration. Various family intervention techniques will be discussed, with a specific focus on multicultural and nontraditional families. Students will participate in a laboratory exercise where they will develop skills in parent training. 3
PSY 587 Practicum II This is an elective experience for students in Clinical Services tracks. Operating in sequence with, and as an extension of, Practicum 577, this course allows students to continue doing clinical work under supervision for a second semester. Course obligations and expectations are the same as PSY 577. Prerequisite: PSY 577.) 3
PSY 611 Advanced Statistical Analysis I This course is part of a two-semester sequence designed to introduce students to a variety of statistical analyses with emphasis on application of statistics appropriate to complex research designs. In the first course of the sequence, topics pertaining to the fundamental issues related to ANOVA, ANCOVA, MANOVA and MANCOVA are covered. The majority of the statistical work will be covered with the use of SPSS. Versatility with the use of this statistical program and interpretation of the output relevant to the various advanced statistics covered in the course constitute the primary focus of the course. 3
PSY 613 Advanced Statistical Analysis II The course is part of a two-semester sequence designed to introduce students to a variety of statistical analyses with emphasis on application of statistics appropriate to complex research designs. In this second course of the sequence, topics pertaining to the fundamental issues related to correlational techniques are covered. Topics include reliability, logistic regression, factor analysis, path analysis, and meta-analysis. The majority of the statistical work will be covered with the use of SPSS. Versatility with the use of this statistical program and interpretation of the output relevant to the various advanced statistics covered in the course constitute the primary focus of the course. 3
PSY 700 Professional Ethics Examination of the professional roles of the psychologist in various settings. Ethical and legal codes are considered in the context of professional dilemmas confronted in practice. Consideration of the historical development of ethical and legal issues in relation to current practice. Examination of current professional issues (e.g., prescription privileges, managed care) and roles in the context of ethical concerns. 3
PSY 701 Introduction to Psychotherapy Practice This course examines professional issues in psychotherapy, including licensure and credentialing, limits of expertise, ethics, managed care, legal concerns, documentation, practice considerations, and risk management. 1.5
PSY 704 Multicultural Issues in Psychology This course explores the issues of mental health service delivery to culturally distinct clients. Focus will be on ethnicity, gender, and other salient personal characteristics, and the effects of these elements on the psychotherapy process and outcome. Skill development will include a more flexible frame of reference for relating to and dealing with diverse clients and their cultural traditions, values, and styles. 3
PSY 706 Supervision and Consultation Seminar Seminar taken in the third year designed to prepare the student for the role of psychotherapy supervisor. Relevant literature will be reviewed and supervision techniques will be modeled and role-played. Various consultation settings will be considered. 1.5
PSY 707 Seminar in Adjustment and Psychopathology Seminar course that will examine advanced current topics in psychopathology and adjustment and current status of research in defining psychopathology and adjustment. Review of current literature and methods of study in areas of stress and coping, anxiety, affective disorders, personality disorders, and schizophrenia. Course will cover selected areas based in part on student areas of interest. Development of student expertise in particular area of adjustment and psychopathology. 3
PSY 802 Marital and Family Therapy This course provides an overview of the history and contemporary application of behavioral and systems based marital and family therapy. Particular focus will be placed on the empirical support for using psychotherapeutic approaches to treat a variety of DSM-IV disorders, ethical, legal, and professional issues in marital and family psychotherapy. Learning methods will include reading, didactic presentation, discussion, role play, and case review. 3
PSY 805 Interpersonal Intervention Strategies Provides an overview of the theory and technique associated with interpersonal psychotherapy. Object relations and interpersonal theory are reviewed to illustrate the development of psychopathology, followed by a focused review of applied intervention strategies. Emphasis is placed on mastering techniques which address the development of a therapeutic alliance, transference, counter-transference, interpretation and termination. 3
PSY 808 Behavior Change and Outcome Assessment Focus will be on psychotherapy interventions which are empirically-supported, with particular emphasis on techniques for commonly encountered client problems. Integration of assessment in psychotherapy and strategies for both single case outcome and program evaluation will be covered. 3
PSY 811 Behavioral Medicine and Health Psychology Application of clinical psychology interventions in the context of medical problems and health maintenance. Focus on stress-related medical problems and the promotion of client behaviors that enhance physical well-being. Consideration of specific topic areas depending on student interest, including coping with medical procedures, compliance with medical advice, stress management in a medical setting, psychological factors related to response to medical problems and recovery. Development of student expertise in specific areas of research and practice. 3
PSY 812 Loss and Bereavement This course will provide an overview of theories, current research, and clinical implications pertinent to the understanding, assessment, and management of loss. In addition, the course will address the implications and application of appropriate clinical interventions intended to facilitate a healthy grieving process and to assist the clients in moving ahead with their lives with a stronger sense of self. Admission of master's level students to this course is by permission of the instructor. In addition, master's level students should have completed COUN 504, 518, 525, 544 or their equivalents. 3
PSY 815 Child Psychotherapy Examines research-informed, time-limited therapy interventions for children and adolescents. The focus will be on those conditions that are most frequently seen in outpatient settings: disorders of non-compliance (e.g., Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Conduct Disorder), AD/HD, Anxiety and Depressive Disorders. Most of the course will focus on behavioral and cognitive behavioral interventions. Some consideration will also be given to psychodynamically oriented play therapy. Various modalities will be considered including parent group training, family, and individual therapy. Issues regarding ethical concerns and managed care will also be addressed. Prerequisite: PSY 532. 3
PSY 817 Family Systems: Assessment and Diagnosis Examination of the legal, ethical, and practical issues associated with the assessment and diagnosis of family dysfunction. Multimodal assessment procedures are explored within the context of family systems theory and through the review of recent research efforts. 3
PSY 840 Elective Practicum For Doctoral Students. This course is available as an elective for zero credits. This is an off-campus applied clinical experience that is designed to extend for one regular semester or two summer periods. Students will provide clinical services to clients under the supervision of a site supervisor, who must be a licensed psychologist. The site must provide weekly training experiences, and a faculty member will provide bi-weekly group case consultation on campus. The site must be approved by the Director of Practica and Internships for the Psy.D. Program. 0
PSY 851 Practicum II This is an on-campus applied clinical experience that is designed to extend for the entire semester. Essentially it is a continuation of Practicum I. It is expected that students will carry on with clinical work that was started in the previous semester. This course carries the same structure, expectations and opportunities as Practicum I. Prerequisite: Practicum I. 3
PSY 860 Practicum III This is an on-campus applied clinical experience that is designed to extend for the entire semester. Students will schedule at least five hours of activity per week. At least two hours a week will be spent doing assessments and psychotherapy with clients in the Psychological Services Center (PSC). Three hours a week will be spent in group supervision with the course instructor. Additional individual supervision will be scheduled on an as needed basis. Students will be expected to complete 30 clinical contact hours. Other opportunities for learning may be added at the discretion of the course instructor. 3
PSY 861 Practicum IV This is an on campus applied clinical experience that is designed to extend for the entire semester. Essentially it is a continuation of Practicum III. It is expected that students will carry on with clinical work that was started in the previous semester. This course carries the same expectations and opportunities as Practicum III. 3
PSY 870 Practicum V This is an on-campus applied clinical experience that is designed to extend for the entire semester. The focus of this practicum is to train the student how to conduct clinical supervision. Each student will be assigned one supervisee. The supervisee will be a student enrolled in Practicum I. All supervised clinical work will occur with clients of the Psychological Services Center (PSC). Students will schedule at least five hours of activity per week. One hour a week will be spent in individual supervision with the assigned supervisee. One hour a week will be spent observing the clinical work of the supervisee. Three hours a week will be spent in group supervision with the course instructor; two of these hours will include students in Practicum I while the last hour will include only students in Practicum V. The student will be expected to complete 15 hours of individual supervision and 15 hours of live observation of the supervisee's clinical work. Other opportunities for learning may be added at the discretion of the course instructor. 3
PSY 871 Practicum VI This is an on-campus applied clinical experience that is designed to extend for the entire semester. Essentially it is a continuation of Practicum V. It is expected that students will carry on with supervision work that was started in the previous semester. This course carries the same expectations and opportunities as Practicum V. 3
PSY 880 A, B Community Practicum I This is an off-campus applied clinical experience that is designed to extend for the entire year. Students will be expected to complete 120 hours at the site each semester. At least 30 of these hours must be spent doing face-to-face clinical work. Other required experiences will include weekly individual supervision with the primary site supervisor, multi-disciplinary consultation, didactic training at the site, and bi-weekly group case consultation with a faculty member on campus. Prerequisite: PSY 851, Practicum II. 1.5
PSY 881 A, B Community Practicum II This is an off-campus applied clinical experience that is designed to extend for the entire year. Students will be expected to complete 180 hours at the site each semester. At least 45 of these hours must be spent doing face-to-face clinical work. Other required experiences will include weekly individual supervision with the primary site supervisor, multi-disciplinary consultation and didactic training at the site. Prerequisite: PSY 880, Community Practicum I. 1.5
PSY 895 A, B Doctoral Project The doctoral project may involve: quantitative surveys; empirical analyses of archival data (e.g., meta-analysis); outcome research; a collection of ten or more empirical case studies (e.g., ABAB or multiple baseline designs); or, group-based nomothetic investigations. Topics appropriate for this project must be related to theory and practice in clinical psychology. 3, 3
PSY 895C Doctoral Project Continuation Following successful completion of PSY 895A and B, students are required to register for Doctoral Project Continuation for each subsequent academic semester until completion of the doctoral project, as determined by the research mentor. 1
PSY 897 A, B Internship (Predoctoral) One year, full-time internship or two years, half-time internship in an approved setting. 1,1
PSYC 211 General Psychology

Offers broad-based investigation of the nature of behavior, stressing general scientific principles, the complexity of human motivation, and the potential of psychology for the student's self realization.

Prerequisite for all other courses.

3
PSYC 251 Developmental Psychology

Presents an overview of human development throughout the life span, including all aspects of personality. Emphasizes interaction of societal expectations with processes of growth and development. Carefully examines major theoretical viewpoints.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211.

3
PSYC 252 Psychology of Adolescence

Explores the psychological characteristics of contemporary adolescents, including cognitive development, peer relations, sexuality, and identity issues.

Prerequisite: PSYC 251.

3
PSYC 253 Psychology of Adult Development and Aging

Investigates goals, expectations, and processes related to transitions in adult life, including work, marriage, parenting, and other personal relationships. Examines the aging process and the needs of the elderly in society.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 270 Psychological Applications of Statistics

The use of descriptive and inferential statistics in solving actual behavioral research problems. Emphasizes conceptual understanding of descriptive and inferential statistics such as correlation, Z-scores, t-test, and analysis of variance.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 310 Research Apprenticeship

Involves student collaboration with faculty in research. Student involvement would include all phases of the research process from literature review to data collection, analysis, and possible presentation or publication of results. Faculty mentors and students are paired, based on availability and shared interests. 

Prerequisite: PSYC 211.

3
PSYC 312 Fundamentals of Neuroscience

Examines basic concepts in neuroscience including: neurons, glial cells, the action potential, and mechanisms of neurotransmitter action. Neuroanatomy will be examined and specific functions of brain regions will be explored in terms of learning and memory, language, behavioral neuroendocrinology, and neurological and psychiatric disorders. Methods used by neuroscientists and neurologists will be discussed throughout the course (cross-listed with Biology 305).

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 314 Physiological Psychology

Survey of the anatomical, physiological, and chemical correlates of behavior. Emphasis on psychopharmacology, sensation, motivation, emotion, learning, and memory. Integrates experimental and clinical research methodologies.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 315 Contemporary Approaches to Learning

Presents a survey and critical examination of prominent contemporary theoretical approaches to learning. Emphasizes issues, research support, and applicability of selected theories to human situations.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 316 Principles and Practices in Behavioral Modification

Investigates the current theory, range of support for modern behavioral and cognitive-behavioral intervention approaches. Ethical issues in the practice of behavior modification.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 317 Psychology of Assessment

Examines the theory and principles of psychological assessment. Major approaches to be covered include: self-report, objective assessment, computerized assessment, projective methods, and behavioral observations.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 318 Industrial Psychology

Presents an introduction to industrial psychology. Focuses on the application of psychological concepts and methods to personnel selection and training, employee motivation and productivity, human engineering, and work effectiveness.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 319 Health Psychology

An introduction to the links between physical health, psychological factors, and emotional well being. Considers theory and research related to optimizing physical and psychological functioning along with risk factors related to illness and psychological dysfunction. Provides an overview of professional issues in this emerging area of psychology.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 321 Industrial-Organizational Seminar in Special Topics

These seminars are designed to provide the I/O major an in-depth study and practice of theories and systems implemented by I/O psychologists within organizational settings. Different seminar topics include Work Motivation and Job Satisfaction, Training and Development, Employee Selection, Organizational Career Development, and Survey Design and Needs Analysis.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 325 Sensation and Perception

The study of human sensory and perceptual processes and phenomena, as well as the scientific methods used to discover this information. Includes study of the visual auditory, gustatory, olfactory, tactile, and proprioceptive senses.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211.

3
PSYC 335 Teaching Apprenticeship

Provides students with didactic and experiential opportunities related to the process of teaching in general and psychology in particular. Student participation will include tutorial work, literature reviews related to teaching, course syllabus construction, course preparation and delivery activities, and processes related to student evaluation. Faculty mentors and students will be matched based on faculty availability and student career objectives. Limited to senior Psychology majors.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 341 Psychology in Film

This course is designed to develop students’ understanding of foundational knowl­edge in Psychology through the analysis of both classic and contemporary films and to explore the effect popular cinema has on audience attitudes and perceptions. 

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 342 Psychology of Hitchcock

This course is designed to develop students’ understanding of foundational knowl­edge in Psychology through the analysis of films by Alfred Hitchcock and the role played by Hitchcock’s own life experiences and psychological dynamics in his film­making. 

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 345 Human Factors and Crew Resource Management

Introduction to the human capabilities and limitations to the design of workplace (and play) systems, human-computer interaction, human information processing, and human performance. Effects of environmental stressors, socio-technical implications, team performance, and perception are surveyed. 

Prerequisite: PSYC 211.

3
PSYC 350 Industrial-Organizational (I/O) Apprenticeship

Provides Psychology majors in the I/O track with mentoring opportunities to participate in work and consulting activities performed by professional I/O psychologists, such as corporate training, employee selection procedures, conflict resolution activities, organizational surveys, etc.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211.

3
PSYC 388 Psychological Profiles in Literature

Investigation of psychological characteristics and behavior patterns of major figures in world literature. Students will be expected to undertake independent research relative to specific literary characters.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211.

3
PSYC 390 Psychology of Religion

An overview of theoretical and empirical investigations of the study of religion in psychology. A variety of representative research methods, content areas, and religious traditions will be sampled, including objective laboratory approaches and subjective and phenomenological approaches.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211.

3
PSYC 399 Research Proposal

Directed readings course involving preparation for honors-level research in Psychology (Psychology 452 or H478). Identification of a topic of interest and preliminary review of existing literature. Development of research proposal and formulation of the design of an original study.

variable credit
PSYC 410 Social Psychology

Deals with foundations of modern social psychology; discusses effects on social interaction by intrapersonal factors and processes, other individuals, groups, and group processes, physical environment; presents theoretical and practical perspectives.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211.

3
PSYC 412 Psychology of Friendship and Peer Relations

Examines the meaning of friendship and the development of concepts of friendship with age. Includes adult relationships, attraction, and affiliation.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211.

3
PSYC 415 Cognitive Psychology

Presents an overview of new areas of research in cognition, including information processing, perception, memory, imagery, and language.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211.

3
PSYC 416 Behavioral Medicine

Examines the application of psychological intervention techniques to the prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of illness. Consideration of topics including biofeedback, relaxation methods, pain management, cognitive and behavioral interventions in rehabilitation, and improving the communication between physicians and patients.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211.

3
PSYC 420 Drugs and Behavior

An overview of the effects of psychoactive drugs on behavior. Examination of clinical applications in anxiety, mood disorders, and schizophrenia. Nonclinical drug use and abuse is also analyzed.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211.

3
PSYC 421 Experimental Psychology I

Designed to help the student understand and apply the research tools of the behavioral sciences. Emphasizes a conceptual understanding of statistics and experimental design. Involves the development of an original research proposal by each student.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211, MATH 216 or PSYC 270.

3
PSYC 422 Experimental Psychology II

Applies principles of PSYC 421 in a laboratory context. Coordinates lectures with experiments. Includes psychophysics, sensation, perception, learning, memory, and individual differences, as well as other research topics.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211, PSYC 421, MATH 216 or PSYC 270. 

3
PSYC 424 Multi-Media Applications in Psychology

This course combines applied research in social psychology, personality, I/O psychology, and human factors with practical training in media applications used by psychologists. Students develop proficiency in word processing programs, spreadsheet applications, presentation software, web page authoring techniques, and interactive computer media.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 425 Conflict and Dispute Resolution

This class explores the theories of justice, analyzes the causes and consequences of conflict, and develops skills for conflict resolution, with emphasis on cooperative communication and mediation. Students will be required to analyze conflict, negotiate settlements, and mediate agreements.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 429 Psychology of the Exceptional Individual

Discusses etiology, characteristics, diagnosis and prognosis of varied exceptionalities, as well as services and educational prescriptions for individuals with variations of exceptionality covering a full range of human functioning. (Recommended background for a variety of potential internship settings.)

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 431 Abnormal Psychology

Introduces the study of maladaptive behavior from a number of theoretical perspectives - e.g., psychoanalytic, behavioral, and biological. Reviews current research concerning the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disturbing behavior. Covers major DSM-IV adult diagnoses. (Recommended background for certain internship settings.)

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 432 Abnormal Behavior in Children and Adolescents

Investigates maladaptive patterns occurring in childhood and adolescence. Integrates experimental and clinical data concerning etiology, evaluation, and treatment. (Recommended background for certain internship settings.)

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 433 Clinical I: Clinical Psychology

Introduction to the scientific and professional aspects of clinical psychology. Examination of multiple roles of clinical psychologists and relationships with other mental health disciplines. Coverage of clinical assessment, treatment, and research, including laboratory experiences in each of these areas. Use of videotape observations, role playing, and analysis of case studies.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 434 Clinical II: Strategies and Techniques

Designed to develop practitioner skills through theory presentation and discussion, examination of clinical issues and experiential applications of appropriate clinical strategies and techniques. Includes role playing, modeling, and audiotape and videotape experiences.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211, PSYC 433. 

3
PSYC 435 Stress, Coping and the Self-concept

Provides direct experience in research, assessment, and treatment issues concerning stress, coping, and the self-concept. Emphasis on in-depth consideration of cognitive and phenomenological theory and research. Students will gain experience with self-monitoring, psychophysiological measures, questionnaire, and experimental methods of assessment. Treatment focuses on cognitive, behavioral, and experiential strategies. Course format will involve lecture, discussion, laboratory, and seminar components.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211, PSYC 450.

3
PSYC 436 Human Relations Training

Designed to afford the student an opportunity to promote personal and interpersonal development through voluntary participation in an ongoing growth group and experiential exercises. Human relations concepts and group process issues complemented by readings, audiotapes, lectures, and group discussion.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 438 Psychology of Gender

Examines gender differences and similarities in socialization, abilities, psychological disorders, and roles in contemporary society. Provides analyses of the historical treatment of women in scientific psychology and potential gender biases in research. Includes films, videotapes, and guest lecturers.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 439 Introduction to Sports Psychology

This course will introduce students to concepts relevant to the competitive sport process. Variables which affect motivation, aggression, skill acquisition, and confidence will be explored. Particular attention will be paid to those psychological techniques applied to speed recovery from injury and interventions utilized to enhance performance.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 440 Forensic Psychology

Examines the nature of forensic evaluations, reports, and expert witness testimony and the professional and ethical responsibility involved. Surveys the primary areas of law including: family law, mental health law, criminal law, child abuse and juvenile law, and personal injury law. Evaluation and treatment of accused persons and working effectively with the criminal justice system.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 445 History and Systems of Psychology

A survey of the historical background and the development of modern psychology with an emphasis on origins and influences of theories. Special attention is given to the Schools of Psychology and their underlying philosophies of science.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 450 Personality Psychology

Presents analysis of major theoretical approaches: psychoanalytic, behavioral, cognitive, biological, phenomenological/existential. Also, presents major areas of personality research - e.g., anxiety, aggression, dominance, self-esteem.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 451A Clinical Internship

Involves experiential opportunity to integrate didactic and applied methods and to acquire and demonstrate basic skills. Provides opportunity to interact with supervisory and professional personnel and to evaluate career goals. Varied placement settings relative to personal career objectives. Permission of instructor required. 

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

variable credit
PSYC 451B Industrial Organizational Internship

Involves experiential opportunity to integrate didactic and applied learning, acquire and demonstrate basic skills; also provides opportunity to interact with supervisory and professional personnel and to evaluate career goals. Varied placement settings relative to personal career objectives. Permission of instructor required. 

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

variable credit
PSYC 452 Honors Thesis in Psychology

Involves opportunity for students to do independent research in psychology under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Requires execution and presentation of an empirical research study. Honors thesis analyzes the results of the study in relation to existing literature and examines ways in which the study enhances knowledge in this area.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211, PSYC 399 recommended. Requires permission of Undergraduate Psychology Department chairperson.

variable credit
PSYC 455 Mediation Practicum

This course is for those who want to improve their mediation skills for mediating complex cases or to become practicing mediators. In class, participants will engage in role playing that presents challenging situations in a variety of disputes such as business, consumer, intergovernmental, neighborhood, landlord/tenant, multiparty, cross cultural, divorce and family, and school-based peer mediation programs.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211, PSYC 425, Conflict and Dispute Resolution, or Prior Mediation Training.

3
PSYC H478 Honor Senior Thesis

Research and/or creative scholarly activity in Psychology under faculty supervision. (Requires permission of honors director.)

Prerequisite: PSYC 211, PSYC 399 recommended.

3
PSYC 490 Senior Seminar

Seminar designed to be a capstone experience in the undergraduate psychology curriculum. Purpose of the course is for students to demonstrate an integration of their learning and mastery of issues in contemporary psychology. Completion of semester-long project that involves student research on a topic of interest, analysis of an internship or service learning experience. Presentation of the results of the senior project would take place in written and oral presentation formats. To be completed in senior year.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

3
PSYC 499 Independent Study

For qualified upperclass students, granted permission to do intensive, independent study in an area of interest. Requires supervision by a faculty member.

Prerequisite: PSYC 211. 

variable credit